Getting The Led Out

Posted in Uncategorized with the tags , , , on October 31st, 2010 by Mr.Miner

10.30.10 - Atlantic City, NJ (Dave Lavery)

Phish primed their Halloween audience on Saturday night with a fun and raucous rock show laced with Led Zeppelin history, crossing the strongest rumor off the never-ending list musical costume possibilities. Filling two sets with ballistic playing, Phish granted the Atlantic City audience an explosive and special show that will go down in the band’s rich Halloween lore.

On the eve of their three-set exclamation holiday show, the band crushed from beginning to end, with much of their impressive improvisation coming before setbreak. Popping through a set-opening trio of “Kill Devil Falls,” “Cavern” and “Foam,” the band clearly carried an extra something with them from the get go on Saturday night. But when the band ripped into what seemed like another innocuous first set “Chalk Dust,” the evening was just getting started. Phish transformed a furiously creative jam into a full-blown stop in Led Zeppelin’s “Whole Lotta Love” before dive-bombing for the ending of “Chalkdust.” At this point, the Zeppelin reference could have been a Halloween preview, or a tease altogether. But when Phish followed up the smoking segment with “Ha Ha Ha,” the joke was clearly on us, and we didn’t even know the half of it.

10/30 Official Poster

“Chalk Dust” began a scintillating first set run that continued with a sticky and percussive “Wolfman’s Brother” that continued to push the envelope of fall versions. Moving out of the composition into a vocal scat over a pulsing groove, the bands musical exploits never stopped while they simultaneously added a fifth vocal layer. Passing into a sparse rhythmic plane, Trey darted through the intricate beats with staccato melodies that Gordon answered with strong counter-leads of his own. Soon enough the band was neck-deep in a pit of percussive quicksand that continued to draw the band down the rabbit hole. Hinting at “Manteca” (as most funk jams this tour have at one point or another) all four members kicked in equitable antes in this rhythmic canvas. A strained, but well intended, transition brought the band from “Wolfman’s” into Fall’s first “Undermind.”

Continuing their rhythm-based jamming, Phish flowed into a standout version of “Undermind” that was delivered with enhanced precision and tightness that has characterized this tour. Trey and Mike entered a dynamic conversation while Fishman held the court for such a discussion to take place. Page comped this scene with organ swells that provided a backdrop for the three-piece summit. Look for some furious work from Red throughout this, potentially, best-ever version.

10.29.10 (J.Weber)

Following the post-hiatus song with two oldies, Phish closed the set with a massive “Bathtub Gin” and “Squirming Coil.” Highlighted by guitar acrobatics – an emerging theme of the show – Phish led “Bathtub Gin” down decidedly dancy road. Oozing right into the thick of things, it took Phish no time to lock into an initial groove that spiraled into a tornado of nasty guitar licks, ballooning bass lines, and collective melodic sensibility. This “Gin” built into a cathartic first set standout that brought one of the legitimate high points of the entire show. Flowing and connected with unparalleled urgency, Phish carried a Mack truck’s worth of momentum through this mind-numbing first half gem.

But after setbreak, Phish built a retro-adventure centered on a “Tweezer” that wove in and out of four Led Zeppelin songs, climaxing with the iconic final verse of “Stairway to Heaven.” As soon as the “Tweezer” jam dropped, Phish went right into tease of “Heartbreaker” before changing back into to “Tweezer” for a stellar couple of minutes that too quickly found their way “Ramble On.” Passing through mere portions of each Zeppelin song, Phish built a classic rock jigsaw puzzle that likened a joyride down high school’s memory lane. After passing through the gorgeous “Thank You,” Phish briefly returned to “Tweezer’s” theme before merging into “Stairway to Heaven.” Turning “Tweezer” into a straight up medley, Phish musically chuckled at any fans that had believed the hype, while creating a wildly entertaining sequence of music along the way.

10.30.10 (Dave Lavery)

Although a smashing and significant “Tube” opened the set followed by a “Possum” that stuck out like a sore thumb, what this show now needed was some pure Phish fire. All teases and jams aside, there was little meat in the second set until the final third. But any concerns were put to rest with an ornate sequence of “2001 > Bowie” that doused the end of the show with some serious improvisation.

Building on the revitalized versions of Fall, Phish absolutely went to town on “2001,” tearing apart the space-funk with a flying passion. Turning Boardwalk Hall upside down and spinning it around, the band really gave this version the full treatment, extending its second half into a clinic of groove. One of those versions where the mind shuts off and the body just moves, this one had the venue bumping as one in the middle of the second set. Flying off the chain with furious runs of notes, it had been ages since Trey had been so active and out front in the space-aged realm – and it was straight up glorious.

10.29.10 (J.Weber)

Dropping into “Bowie’s” intro at “2001’s” peak, the band unveiled another resuscitated piece of their catalog that has shined throughout Fall. A dialed-in rendition littered with nuances and intricacies, Mike, Trey and Page played a game of musical tag, chasing each other through a labyrinth of psychedelia. A perfect example of the new and improved Phish, the amount of ideas conveyed within this compact musical cannonball was stunning, as the band never let up from the moment the jam began. Unquestionably the musical highlight of the show, you can take “2001> Bowie” to the bank – top-notch stuff.

“Show of Life” set up a set closer from which the band could have selected a number of successful songs, but “Number Line” wasn’t one of them. Using this enigma of a song as a contained set closer contains very little power, and honestly, leaves the show wanting more. And luckily, last night, Phish had a little more in them, capping the set with a filthy and fitting encore of “Good Times, Bad Times.” Finalizing the evening with a last tease of “Whole Lotta Love” after “Reprise,” suffice it to say that Phish got their Led out on Saturday night, treating the South Jersey audience to a full-on experience. But now that Zeppelin is out, what will the costume be? Nobody knows a thing and the witching hour is quickly approaching! Your guess is as good as mine, but if one thing is for sure, the last night of Fall tour will be one for the books.

I: Kill Devil Falls, Cavern, Foam, Guelah Papyrus, Chalk Dust Torture > Whole Lotta Love > Chalk Dust Torture, Ha Ha Ha, Walk Away, Wolfman’s Brother > Undermind, Bathtub Gin*, The Squirming Coil

II: Tube, Possum*, Tweezer* > Heartbreaker^ > Ramble On^> Thank You^ > Tweezer > Stairway to Heaven^, Halley’s Comet > Also Sprach Zarathustra > David Bowie, Show of Life, Backwards Down the Number Line, Good Times Bad Times

E: Sleeping Monkey, Tweezer Reprise*

* w/ “Whole Lotta Love” teases, ^ incomplete

Tags: , , ,

Boardwalk Beginnings

Posted in Uncategorized with the tags , on October 30th, 2010 by Mr.Miner

10.29.10 - Boardwalk Hall (Jon Weber)

Phish kicked off their three-night run in Atlantic City finale with a strong second frame Friday night that set the tone for the rest of the weekend. Showcasing several pieces that stood out throughout fall tour, Phish molded a front-loaded series of grooves in a hearty musical entrée on the Boardwalk of the Jersey Shore. Shaking off a sluggish opening set with the closing combo of “Cities > 46 Days,” these last two songs ignited the band, setting the table for an eventful second act.

After this retro-tour filled with intimate venues and often with immaculate sound, the “legendary” Boardwalk Hall was a bit of a let down in terms of size and sound. A massive room with a huge domed ceiling likening a natatorium, the music lost considerable quality on the floor beyond the soundboard, as it drifted into the rafters above. Hopefully, Phish’s crew will have the room sounding far better for the rest of this special weekend.

10.29.10 (J.Weber)

But let’s get back to the music. Carrying over the adrenalized energy of “46 Days” into the opening “Punch You In the Eye,” Phish lit a fuse to the second half of the show. But Friday night’s fire burned the brightest during the subsequent combination of “Sand” and “Carini” – two songs that have stood as beacons of light all Fall. Morphing the show into a rhythmic odyssey, the band smoothly progressed through an exquisute excursion of “Sand.” Rejuvenated with musical density, “Sand” has emerged as one of the all-stars of tour, and last night Phish provided more evidence to its defense. Transforming into liquid textures, Trey played laid-back leads over a jazzy pocket, allowing plenty of room for Page’s clavinet offerings. Boasting distinct flow and gradually building momentum, this version typifies the evolved version of “Sand” for this era, where the entire band donates to the dense puzzle rather than Trey annihilating solos over a linear beat.

Not only boasting a stupendous peak, “Sand” moved beyond, into an uncharted melodic realm where the entire band helped build the piece away from the song’s foundation into a free form jam. Taking “Sand” where it has never gone before, the band transitioned into a mid-tempo groove where the band moved singlemindedly. Open jamming wthin “Sand” – next generation stuff – who’d have thunk it? This very impressive improvisational sequence concluded with a somewhat abrupt, Trey-led switch into “Carini.” Though anytime “Carini” drops these days, a gorgeous jam is sure to follow. Building off the song’s sizzling arena rock, Phish used their newly revitalized vehicle to explore sparser, bass-led textures. Moving into creative dance patterns and then into an experimental outro, creativity was at a paramount once again as the each band member contributed to a song that was once defined by wailing guitar.

10.29.10 (J.Weber)

Melting into “Prince Caspian,” Phish used a more conventional version of their power-ballad to take a breath after two standout jaunts. Though many recent versions have been underlined by whole-band interplay, this one rode the coattails of Trey’s solo, completing the set’s opening sequence in classic fashion. After a brief pause to communicate, the band dropped into Taj Mahal’s “Corrina” straight out of left field, and the cover brought complete serenity to the show, drenching the audience in soulful melody.

At this natural break, the show could have gone in any number of directions, as a certain jam vehicle loomed around the corner. Selecting another scorching highlight of the fall, Phish began a particularly dense “Piper,” taking the set on a high-speed roller coaster ride. Communicating with incredible proficiency, the band sped into super-glued intergalactic journey, pushing the boundaries of new-school Phish. Navigating their spaceship as if commanded by a single mind, the band careened through a mid-set peak and found their way into “Theme From the Bottom” to resolve the maniacal chase.

10/29 Official Poster (Duval)

After an out of place “Golgi,” the band – again – chose a fall highlight that has stood out since its surreal unveiling in Broomfield, “Slave to the Traffic Light.” Patiently building the spiritual soundtrack, Trey infused this version with that extra zest that separates great versions from the good ones. Fishman was with him from the inception on a meticulous climb to the stars. Boasting supreme phrasing from all members, this version carried certain majesty from beginning to end, bringing the show to a colossal and cathartic peak.

Building off “Slave’s” cleansing conclusion, Phish continued the upbeat vibe with “Fluffhead.” Closing the set with a relatively clean version of the multi-part composition, the show ended in blissful rage as Trey took liberty with his final solo, forming a multi-tiered, anthemic geyser. Giving a nod to last year’s Halloween costume, Phish ended the evening with Exile on Main Street’s “Loving Cup,” but there was nary a hint of what the band might do come tomorrow night’s second set. But that’s a whole ‘nother show away. Tonight is shaping up to be a Saturday night barnburner on the Boardwalk in AC. Often times Phish drops their most significant music of a holiday run before the final night, and with a strong boost from Friday’s second set, Saturday night has plenty of room for a freak scene. Soon we shall see…

10.29.10 (J.Weber)

1st Set Notes: Despite succinct versions of rarities “Light Up or Leave Me Alone” and “Timber Ho!,” the first set never picked up any steam until the band transitioned out of “Moma” into “Cities.” Taking the cover in a diverse direction, the band built away from conventional funk grooves into a soupier, psychedelic ambiance that eventually twisted into “46 Days.” Though ballistically crushing the set closer, the entire frame came across a bit haphazardly. But with the putting the pedal to the medal during the closer, Phish was on their way far more impressive second half.

I: The Star Spangled Banner, My Soul, AC/DC Bag, Ocelot, Sample in a Jar, Light Up Or Leave Me Alone, Sugar Shack, Timber Ho!, Bouncing Around the Room, Axilla, Rift, The Moma Dance > Cities > 46 Days

II: Punch You In the Eye, Sand > Carini > Prince Caspian, Corinna, Piper > Theme From the Bottom, Golgi Apparatus, Slave to the Traffic Light, Fluffhead

E: Loving Cup

Tags: ,

Hallo-What?

Posted in Uncategorized with the tags , , , on October 28th, 2010 by Mr.Miner

10.11.10 - Broomfield (Brooks Perry)

Frank Zappa, Genesis, Led Zeppelin, Jimi Hendrix, Queen, King Crimson, and The Police are just some of the many artists that have been ground through the Halloween rumor mill in past weeks. While last year, Phish included their fan base in the evolving mystery of what musical costume they would don for the holiday, this year we have been left in the dark. So many rumors have been tossed around with so many rationalizations that it is hard to believe any of them. We are two days away from Halloween and Phish has the entire community stumped – and kudos to them for keeping the secret all to themselves.

Both Mike and Trey have done interviews vaguely discussing the Halloween album, both giving it high praise. Gordon said:

I’m really excited about it, to the point where I’m calling some of my friends and I’m saying, ‘Well, I don’t even have any more room on my guest list, but you’ve got to come somehow, because this is going to be the one.’ It just really feels right to me.

10.23.10 (C. La Jaunie)

While Trey’s significant soundbite was as follows:

This year, this one’s for me. The one we picked, I’m going to get more out of this as a musician than I ever have before. Three songs into it, I called everybody and told them, ‘None of the other ones — I wouldn’t think, hopefully — will have nearly the effect on my playing this one’s going to.

Without dropping any clues, the band, themselves, are hyping up Boadwalk Hall’s blowout, clearly enjoying the fact that nobody knows what will happen.

Just yesterday, Atlantic City radio personality, Pinky Kravitz (father of part-time Phish photographer, Jeff Kravitz) speculated in print that Phish will play Led Zeppelin for Halloween, citing a “magic mockingbird” as his source. This published conjecture has made the British rockers’ double-album “Physical Graffiti” the newest lead horse in this guessing derby. But if Phish has kept everyone guessing for this long, I find it highly unlikely they would allow the answer to leak days before Halloween.

Other front-running possibilities include Queen’s “A Night at the Opera,” Genesis, “The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway” or “Selling England By the Pound,” Jimi Hendrix’s “Electric Ladyland,” King Crimson’s “Lark’s Tongue In Aspic,” and any number of Frank Zappa albums. Assuming Phish is trying to please the entire audience, the abstract prog-rock of King Crimson has to be crossed out, while “The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway’s” 90-minute, intricate rock opera seems unlikely for similar reasons. Though Trey is known to love both of these bands, these albums seem too inaccessible for a Halloween party.

10.12.10 (Bill Hartlage)

While many fans have expressed interest in Phish stepping outside the boundaries of classic rock, many of the current possibilities are going right down that road. British glam-rockers, “Queen” and the eclectic Frank Zappa round out the most talked about candidates. Might the band honor the 15-year old fan ballot from 1995, when the high-vote getter was allegedly Zappa’s “Joe’s Garage?” That year, Phish vetoed the democratic process by playing The Who’s “Quadrophenia” at Rosemont Horizon in Chicago.

10.12.10 (B.Perry)

To add another layer to this puzzle, an anonymous inside source recently claimed this year’s musical costume is more complex and was harder for the band to learn than any they’ve chosen before. This clue has pushed my thinking in the direction of Zappa’s catalog and away from the guitar-driven rock of Zeppelin and Hendrix. But at this point, nobody is sure of anything – and that is the best aspect of the mystery!

Another part of me feels that Phish might have a huge prank waiting in the wings and that all of these conjectures are way off base. I don’t know where that leaves us, but something might happen that nobody ever saw coming. All of the talked albums have been talked about in previous years, and it would be just like Phish to come out and play something in a completely opposite direction. Last year, clues were leaked by now and some people knew the deal, but nobody I’ve come in contact with on tour seems to have a clue.

With only five sets of Phish separating us from the answer, musical hints may lie within. So keep your ears peeled and keep on guessing, because something tells me we won’t know the answer until it happens. And that’s just the way the band wants it.

10.12.10 - Broomfield (Bill Hartlage)

Tags: , , ,

Reigniting the Fuse

Posted in Uncategorized with the tags , on October 27th, 2010 by Mr.Miner

10.23.10 (Matt Wagner)

Phish bounced right back from Sunday night with a smashing two-set effort in Manchester, New Hampshire that popped from the very start and never let up. With an opening frame comprised of all but two songs un-played this tour, and a liquid second set that rolled off the stage in a non-stop musical highlight, Phish returned to the magical pastures of last week on Tuesday night. Featuring a stunning open jam in “Light” and a dazzling “Ghost” packaged in a knockout”Mike’s Groove,” Phish crafted one of their most engaging sets of the season. Spring-boarding off one of their best nights of tour, Phish will take a two-day break before they head south to Atlantic City for a three-day extravaganza to close out Fall 2010.

10.23.10 (D.Lavery)

The band surprised the entire audience by opening the evening with “After Midnight,” playing the song for only the second time in history and flashing everyone back to the all-night millennial blowout at Big Cypress. Setting an electric vibe immediately, Phish never looked back as they burst with energy and precision through each selection in the opening half. Continuing with smoking versions of “The Sloth” and “Alumni Blues > Letter to Jimmy Page > Alumni Blues,” “Alumni’s” funk jam took center stage as the band locked together early. A particularly smooth and extended “Mellow Mood” provided one of the highlights of the opening set, while also foreshadowing a special second half moment. The parade of fall debuts progressed with Gordon’s “Access Me,” “Llama” and Trey’s “All of These Dreams.” But the centerpiece of a well-crafted first frame came in 2010’s second-only “The Curtain (With),” whose jam soared with enhanced poignancy, taking “With” to another level of beauty.

10.23.10 (C. La Jaunie)

The other indelible first set standout came in the long-awaited 2010 debut of “A Song I Heard the Ocean Sing.” Although the post-hiatus piece didn’t jump out of the box, Trey annihilated the song in a nasty guitar showcase. Bringing the edgier jam to several searing peaks, the band collectively cremated the elusive nugget that is so desperately begging to be put into rotation. Capping the first half with the fall’s second “It’s Ice” and another debut, “Walls of the Cave,” the opening frame overflowed with energy and featured impeccable song selection. But all the fun and debuts contained in the first half merely the table for a second set that stands among the tour’s best.

10.23.10 (Dave Lavery)

Kicking open door number two with a minimalist turned raucous “Possum,” Phish gave the song a more hearty run through than the many first set versions we’ve seen, reaching some engaging uptempo territory. But when “Light” dropped in the second slot, the festivities commenced in earnest. Taking the metaphysical piece on, perhaps, its defining excursion of the fall, Phish sculpted a multi-tiered piece of psychedelia. Blasting through the opening segment with intricate and powerful communication, the band seamlessly migrated into a rolling groove that Trey painted with rhythmic-turned-free-form melodies. Passing into an amorphous section of jamming, Phish locked onto each others’ ideas, steadily blossoming in a soul-tugging groove. As Fishman and Mike switched up their patterns, it sounded as though the band was momentarily moving towards “Manteca,” but what materialized was a full-on jam on the “Alumni Blues” funk groove that shined in the opening set – but with a whole lot more accoutrements! Moving right beyond the theme into a series of infectious dance grooves, Phish did back flips amidst IT, as they effortlessly cruised through a spectacular section of music. And just before they came to a conclusion, Trey perfectly inserted the opening lick of “Mike’s Song.”

10.23.10 (Dave Lavery)

There’s nothing quite like taking a massive jam to the dome and then being blindsided by another powerhouse. And with each subsequent version this fall, a powerhouse is exactly what “Mike’s Song” is becoming. Like a musical uppercut, the band tore apart a dense trip to the underworld as Trey unleashed all sorts of creative leads in a crunching heavy-hitter. The entire band attacked this jam with all of the show’s ballooning momentum, completely imploding Manchester’s Verizon Wireless Arena. With intent and menacing urgency, “Mike’s” brought a boisterous end to “Light’s” delicacies while drenching the crowd in symphonic fury. Musical density took hold of this version, as the same eight minutes seemed far longer as Phish bombarded us with sinister ideas. And upon arriving at “Mike’s” closing power chords, the band chose “Simple” to follow. Riding out the song’s melody into a serene musical zephyr, Phish tricked the gentle jam down into “Makisupa Policeman.”

Gregory Isaacs (1950-2010)

While second set stops in Phish’s silly reggae number have been known to derail frames altogether, last night’s version has the opposite effect. Using the piece to segue into the late-Gregory Isaac’s classic “Night Nurse,” the band gave a sincere nod to one of Jamaica’s greatest musicians and vocalists. Isaacs died the the previous day, October 25, after an extended battle with lung cancer, and Phish honored him with, perhaps, their most well-executed reggae cover ever played. Oozing with an authentic roots vibe that often lacks in Phish’s reggae playing, they had clearly practiced this one and wanted to make sure they nailed it. Turning the mid-sized venue into an island dance hall, everyone ate up the tribute, and without missing a beat, the band moved right back into “Makisupa.” Pure cash money.

Official Manchester Poster

A juicy stop in “The Wedge” followed up the reggae vibe nicely, setting the table for an extended jaunt through the now-elusive “Ghost.” Long overdue, some began to wonder if the band was holding out for Halloween to drop the eerie funk staple, but such theories were put to rest with a dynamic second-set highlight that straddled the line between groove and rock. Beginning with a sparser rhythmic canvas, the band gradually layered ideas atop the sonic brew slowly bringing it to a boil. Trey and Page worked collaboratively on the top half of the jam as Mike and Fish snapped off a rhythmic pocket as tight as glue. The whole band came together in this piece, illustrating the lightening quick communication and gleaming chops of Phish right now. A harder beat and more forceful guitar leads pushed this version through a blissful bridge and into a mind-numbing sequence of subconscious Phish. The band careened towards a staggering peak as if strapped to the back of a rocket, and once they reached there, they slowly moved down the other side of the mountain with a mystical passage that seamlessly transformed into “Mango Song.”

“Mango” carried the infectious energy of the night through an enthusiastic outing, and upon the song’s ending, Phish burst into “Weekapaug” sans gaudy bass intro. Capping the set with a full-throttle bug out, “Weekapaug” overflowed with musical creativity while the band also lyrically reprised “Ghost” and “Night Nurse” in a set-ending mashup. Surfing a tidal wave of energy and emotion, Phish referenced “Low Rider” on the way to the “Weekapaug’s” ending – an ending that would be promptly blown out into a thrilling “Llama” reprise, complete with the entire first verse! Finishing the set with a final “Taboot, Taboot!” the band put down their blazing instruments, still flaming from the thrilling adventure. Picking them up once more for a “Show of Life” encore, the emotive ballad closed the evening with proper majesty.

10.23. 10 (Ryan Gilbertie)

Treating the mid-week crowd to a stellar performance, Phish’s newest era continued full-steam ahead last night as they put a mellow weekend in Massachusetts behind them, and blasted towards an imminent Halloween explosion this weekend. In another show filled with standout playing, tightly-woven and self-referential jamming, and an overall Phishy spirit, the band placed another golden brick in the road of Fall Tour last night.

And with only three left to go, we have reached the brink of Phish’s Halloween blowout in Atlantic City! Travel safely, wherever you are coming from, and we’ll meet up on the Jersey shore to put a collective exclamation point on a transformative fall tour. See you there! reigniting

I: After Midnight, The Sloth, Alumni Blues > Letter to Jimmy Page > Alumni Blues, Mellow Mood, Access Me, Llama, All of These Dreams, The Curtain (With), Scent of a Mule, A Song I Heard the Ocean Sing, It’s Ice, Walls of the Cave

II: Possum, Light > Mike’s Song > Simple > Makisupa Policeman > Night Nurse* > Makisupa Policeman, The Wedge, Ghost > The Mango Song, Weekapaug Groove > Llama Reprise

E: Show of Life

*debut, Gregory Isaacs

Tags: ,

Fall In Abstract

Posted in Uncategorized with the tags , on October 25th, 2010 by Mr.Miner

Providence (Andrew Spears)

***

Charleston (Taylor Gautier)

***

Providence (Andrew Spears)

Tags: ,

Songs In the Key of Trey

Posted in Uncategorized with the tags , on October 25th, 2010 by Mr.Miner

10.23.10 - Amherst (Matt Wagner)

Some shows have IT and some shows don’t. And last night’s show never even came close. Aside from standout, but structured, versions of “Stash” in the first set and “Bowie” in the second set, there was no improvisation to speak of in Amherst’s second show, leaving many fans scratching their head trying to figure out what happened Sunday night and why. After a song-driven effort on Saturday evening, Phish came out with zero intent last night, seemingly happy to play a benign list of singles with almost zero creativity. Every tour has a speed bump – a low-point – and without question there won’t be a less engaging show this fall than Amherst’s Sunday night finale.

10/24 Amherst Pollock

After what felt like a rocking set-up show on Saturday, Phish’s homecoming to New England never truly came to fruition. After a week of cutting edge playing, starting on Charleston’s second night and ending on Friday in Providence, the band significantly reeled in their improvisation for the college town. And on Sunday, they never allowed themselves to get into any flow, playing a show that fell as flat as a pancake. The night seemed so divergent in music and tone than any this tour, the entire show seemed wholly out of place. Midway through the second set, the show had lost any semblance of momentum, stumbling to an uneventful finish. Phish continued their precise playing, but by choosing to not bring their music anywhere interesting, they sealed the fate of the evening.

Let’s start with what matters most. Amidst an old-school setlist, including the long-time bust-out of “Ride Captain Ride” since Philly ’99, Phish innocently dropped into “Stash” as the first piece of improvisation of the evening. A song that hasn’t received much love in this era finally got a moment to shine last night, albeit still stuffed in the middle of the opening set. Drifting into the jam with delicacy, Trey’s licks began out of the gate with an intricate intention as Page’s piano chased his melodies over a subtle pocket. The band remained in the song until Trey played a repetitive descending lick that launched the band into a blissful plane of harmony. Fishman anchored himself in the rhythms of “Stash,” as the band took off in a three-part convergence. Big Red’s leadership and fire guided the band through this gorgeous segment and back into build of the song. While not incredibly exploratory, this rendition carried something special, possibly signifying big things to come. But they never did.

10.23.10 (M. Wagner)

Following up the highlight of the show, “Fee’s” tranquil ambient jam morphed into “Time Turns Elastic” which crushed any momentum of the set, leaving the closing combination of “Cavern,” “Antelope” detached from the frame altogether. Though “Antelope” featured slick interplay – specifically Trey and Fish –  hopes of revisiting a jam like Utica never materialized, as we settled for a high-octane, though unadventurous, version.

Even when Phish opened the second set – a set that seemed bound to explode – they chose straight forward versions of “Seven Below” and “Wolfman’s” to get things going. And from there the songs just kept rolling – one more out of context than the next. Ironically, “Roggae > Taste” was played quite well, but its mellow vibe seemed like a soporific joke after nothing of note had happened in the set. Although the band did play a hot “David Bowie,” it represented a feeble attempt at salvaging the show after the cause had long been lost. A “Quinn,” “Chalk Dust” encore only brought two more uneventful songs to a ho-hum evening through and through.

Let’s brush this one under the rug and scurry off to New Hampshire.

I: AC/DC Bag, Camel Walk, The Divided Sky, Ride Captain Ride, Stash, Fee > Time Turns Elastic, Cavern, Run Like an Antelope

II: Seven Below, Wolfman’s Brother, Backwards Down the Number Line, Alaska, Free, The Lizards, Brother, Roggae > Taste, Waste, David Bowie

E: Quinn the Eskimo, Chalk Dust Torture

Tags: ,

A Saturday Night Smoker

Posted in Uncategorized with the tags , on October 24th, 2010 by Mr.Miner

10.20.10 (Casey Boire)

Powered by a second set of with rock anthems, Phish played a song-driven, Saturday night show that succeeded in droves in Amherst, Massachusetts last night. Boasting a definite flow and undeniable energy, the second set featured enough improvisation to carry the show, not to mention a monster “Tweezer” that anchored a choppy opening half. Pulling off the type of show that six months ago wouldn’t have gone over nearly as well, the band’s colossal progress was wholly apparent. Phish can pretty much do what they choose at this point and crush it, it’s just a matter of what type of set they want to put together. Last night they chose a super-charged rock-based show to the delight of Mullins Center weekend crowd. And when the dust settled, it may have not been as exploratory as the past several nights, but the first night at UMASS was undoubtedly filled with high grade Phish.

10.20.10 (C.Boire)

One night after opening Providence with “Down With Disease,” the band came right back and inserted the crowd favorite as the second set opener. Obviously juiced to explore the song, the band took an extensive excursion, favoring high octane and intricate jamming. Phish quickly digressed from the main theme into a more dissonant and abstract path with Trey and Mike leading the charge playing intertwining lead lines in a ever-expanding piece of psychedelia. Moving into a more earnest experiment, Phish dropped into a sparser realm with Trey continuing to seethe atop the music. Before long, Fishman picked up the beat again, launching the band back into high-speed rock and roll jamming. As Page added more bizarre sounds, the jam took on a heavier feel which the band latched onto. Slowing into a snarling groove, the band wound down the jaunt with a section that would have been best to continuing for a while.

Mullins 10/23 (Pollock)

But instead, the Saturday setlist kept moving into “My Friend, My Friend” and “Prince Caspian – not exactly prime placement by Big Red. “Caspian,” however, continued its trend of interesting versions, this time featuring stellar, whole-band interplay and an abstract outro whose course seemed charted for “What’s The Use?” But when Phish finally made their transition, they, instead, stepped into another welcome second-set version of “Halfway To The Moon.” Infusing Page’s dark groove into the rotation this fall, this version built upon Broomfield’s outing as the band proceeded to jam out of the song and into a very slick, bass-led segue with “Boogie On Reggae Woman.” The Stevie Wonder cover stayed wholly contained, completing a non-stop run of songs and segues to kick of the second set.

At a time when the show really could have used a significant jam vehicle, the band chose a retro-route, unveiling the first “Maze” of fall. Tearing into the second-set version with abandon, the song peaked furiously with standout solos from both Page and Trey, but it didn’t quite provide the shot in the arm the show needed. After finding their way our of this “Maze,” Phish cooled off in “Velvet Sea” before taking the show home with its most engaging segment – “Piper > Hood, YEM” – all outstanding versions.

10.20.10 (Casey Boire)

Opening this final sequence, “Piper” continued the electrified rock vibe with a disgusting version that featured a passionate opening segment bordering on the musical embodiment of desperation. Phish finally broke down the full-on sonic surge into a series of scurrying percussive patterns that built into a reprising the “Maze” jam. Revisiting the high speed chase of the set’s centerpiece before dropping into “Harry Hood,” Phish dropped a clear self-reference before moving forward. Coupled with the band’s balls-out playing right now, a delicate piece like “Harry Hood” becomes far more nuanced and multi-dimensional. Not only did the band spice up the intro to the song, the jam transformed into one of the most cohesive and poignant passages of of the entire show. Trey and Mike danced their lines in rolling pasture of melody as Fishman backed the climbing piece with effervescent beats and masterful cymbal work. Patient and tranquil, yet driving and emotive – this version fit the song’s archetype perfectly. And as the band sustained the peak, Trey counted off a set closing “You Enjoy Myself” that everyone could see from a mile away.

10.20.10 (C.Boire)

Getting into their second full-band “YEM” of tour, Trey has shied from guitar hero in favor of formulating more interesting rhythmic collaborations. Jumping off the trampolines and into a pool of pristine groove, the band dove into a sparse pattern where each band member virtually took turns playing. Morphing into a more conventional build, the jam was chock full of nasty guitar licks and rhythmic dynamics from Mike and Fish.

Capping the night with “Shine A Light,” Phish finished their least exploratory show of the past week with no truly groundbreaking material, but still succeeded in tearing apart the Mullins Center nonetheless. When the band can pull of a song-driven affair with the energy and creativity involved last night, everyone leaves happy.

See ya’ll tomorrow.

***

10.20.10 (C.Boire)

First Set Notes: The show popped open with “Meatstick” and “Party Time” and an energetic “Kill Devil Falls,” but largely consisted of a string of songs with a massive “Tweezer” in the middle. Everyone felt a “Tweezer” coming last night, but Phish surprised the entire building as they rolled it out as the fifth song of a mellow first set. Regardless, the band played a version that could have been placed in either set, leaping into a multi-tiered journey. Opening the jam with a hefty dose of swanky grooves, the band played with a swagger early on, a vibe that permeated this entire laid-back rendition. Bumping with some earnest dance patterns, the band got super thick for the first part of this show standout. Once rhythmic experiment passed, Phish swam through a brief channel of ambient tonality on the way to a extended pimp ride with the top rolled down. Playing with incredible restraint, all band members offered minimalist phrases that combined to form something far greater. Trey surfaced the seemingly-extinct whale for parts of this section, blending his notes perfectly with the smooth soundscapes. This intricate minimalism continued for quite a while as Mike cut the path through the forest, allowing Trey to emerge from the trees with a gorgeous solo. Bringing this segment into a more traditional “Tweezer” build to cap the run through, Phish went to the retro wind-down ending before continuing a slow set of songs. The band did cap the frame, however, with the ever-elusive first-set “Reprise” bringing the first half to a fierce close. And to throw in some extra fun, Trey layered “Meatstick” lyrics in place of “Step into the freezer,” enthusiastically bridging the set full circle.

PS: Fall photos needed! Hook it up…send contributions to mrminer@phishthoughts.com!

I: Meatstick, Party Time, Golgi Apparatus, Kill Devil Falls, Tweezer, Lawn Boy, Sparkle, Big Black Furry Creature from Mars, Hold Your Head Up > Love You > Hold Your Head Up, Possum, Tweezer Reprise*

II: Down with Disease > My Friend, My Friend > Prince Caspian** > Halfway to the Moon > Boogie On Reggae Woman, Maze, Wading in the Velvet Sea, Piper > Harry Hood, You Enjoy Myself

E: Shine a Light

* w/ Meatstick lyrics, ** unfinished

Tags: ,

No Looking Back

Posted in Uncategorized with the tags , on October 23rd, 2010 by Mr.Miner

Utica, NY - 10.20.10 (Michael Stein)

Building off an insane night in Utica, it only took one mellow set before Phish blast things right back into the future with a second half of music dripping with free form creativity. After Utica showcased two sets filled with ingenious twists, turns and teases, Phish turned on the fire hose for the second set last night, blasting the Dunkin’ Donuts Center in Providence with stellar open jamming in full-on affair that was underlined by a sky-scraping tour highlight in “Rock and Roll > Carini.” Meanwhile, Phish filled the rest of the set with a furious “Mike’s Groove,” a deep dive into a late-set “Light,” and a surprise closing triumvirate in “Character Zero > 2001 > Loving Cup.” Say what you will about the first set, but Providence’s second half stands up to anything played this tour – the next chapter of Phish music. For the first time in a long time, tour is a place where psychedelic fantasies are realized each and every night, and the band is locked into something magical. The comeback is over and we are firmly planted in the next era – Phish is now.

10.20.10 (M.Stein)

Kicking off the frame with the first “Rock and Roll” of fall, one knew things would become interesting, and with the level of the band’s playing having completely changed, the meaning of “interesting” has greatly evolved as well. Without stepping on one cliche in a song once filled with them, the band sculpted one of the indelible pieces of improvisation this fall. Even the “composed” jam was filled with originality as Trey’s playing took on a life of its own amidst a band cohesive and shredding. Exiting the upbeat textures and entering a sinister piece of avant-garde jamming, Phish displayed a collective intent to come right back after a stellar show and move right beyond it. Flowing in a full-band journey, Phish took this jam far into cutting edge territory. Trey played eerie, hypnotic leads as Mike navigated abstract bass leads for the duration of this oceanic space groove. With virtuoso beats and fills, Fishman’s offerings, per usual, were integral to this ultimate triumph of this piece. If open-ended psychedelia is your thing, crank this one is your headphones and bask in the bliss that is the razor’s edge of modern Phish jamming.

10.20.10 (M.Stein)

When Trey dropped the opening chords of “Carini,” he ended the stratospheric excursion and started a second, equally impressive jaunt. Building significantly upon Broomfield’s version, Providence’s “Carini” soared into a cathartic realm that showcased sublime melody over the usually dark groove. Trey wove a melodic theme into this jam which he not only became a significant part of this jam, but would later reprise in “Light.” Moving into a blissful section of legitimate free form improvisation, the band swam in IT, finding their way into a section of final of outright groove that concluded the wild ride. This brand new direction for “Carini” continued the set’s unparalleled creativity, and concluded a serious, top-shelf segment of new school Phish. Listen immediately and at all costs, as this the type of stuff that we’ve been waiting a year and a half for. And to use an overused, but incredibly appropriate quote – “It’s all happening.”

10.20.10 (M.Stein)

As the band drifted into “My Problem Right There,” it sounded – for a moment – like a segue into “Ghost,” but that would have been pushing the comical. Instead, the band inserted their new Americana piece as a landing pad for the opening sequence of non-stop improvisation. Building each time out, “My Problem Right There” brought a mellow mid-set interlude to a raucous set that took no time getting back there. Without skipping a beat, Trey started up a mid-set “Mike’s” that brought far more engaging play than we’ve heard from the song in quite a while. Tearing the jam to smithereens, the entire band played with a precision and passion that only comes when thinking ceases – something that has clearly happened over the past week of revolutionary music. Taking the always-linear piece into a tangential section, I almost thought we were about to here the ever-elusive second “Mike’s” jam, but instead, the band bridged the “Groove” with an enthusiastic “Sanity” that featured a dissonant, wall-of sound, outro, setting the table for a scintillating run through “Weekapaug.” Littered with nasty licks and percussive breakdowns, this was vintage “Weekapaug” –  what should sound like. Tipping their cap to Rhode Island with the song named after a district in the state, Phish punctuated a mid-set “Mike’s Groove” with its most significant piece.

10.20.10 (M.Stein)

“Suzy Greenberg” followed “Weekapaug” with a feel-good piece whose jam actually took on a real direction rather than generic funk wankery. Then out of left field, Phish dropped into a late-set “Light.” The band is sticking with the new arrangement, giving the piece a far more open-ended vibe, as the lyrical reprise never comes until the improvisation is over. This breathes life into the intial build, as we no longer know that it is heading for a pre-designated peak, but it is now the opening section of today’s most exploratory Phish jam. Taking last night’s version on an fully-synched and intricate ride through the cosmos, Phish sounded like the band of the future. Floating through gorgeous, mind-numbing soundscapes, the entire band contributed equally to open improv. Gaining an edge during its second half, Trey let himself go in a never-ending melodic lead that underlined the latter portion of the jam. Likening a modern day “Dark Star,” “Light” continues to be Phish’s portal to the outer realms of the universe as all members engaged in a four-part psychedelic symphony. After such musical drama, Phish could have walked off the stage to an ovation after “Light,” but instead dropped into a crunching “Character Zero” that was strewn with the same creativity as the rest of the frame, and would surely act as its closer.

10.20.10 (M.Stein)

But as the song came to a end, Trey walked over to Page and Mike, signifying that Phish wasn’t done just yet. Sustaining the final note in a faux climax, Fish kicked the band into a shocking “2001.” Tearing through a torrid session of grooves, Phish continued to breath new life back into this piece as well. No longer five minutes of generic funk, Phish followed Charleston’s centerpiece with another impressive run through. After bringing the show to a peak, the band capped the night with a perfectly-placed “Loving Cup.”

A different landscape than only months ago, a Phish show is again a place where skulls are crushed nightly; a place where you don’t know if you will necessarily be the same after the lights come back on. With fascinating musical intrigue unfolding nightly, Phish has regained that unnameable magic to come out every night with something that leaves us floored. The last year and a half has built to this very point. Proficiency is an issue of the past, and creativity is the sole force guiding Phish music again. The future is now.

It’s all happening. Again.

***

Official Providence Poster

First Set Notes: A particularly slow, song-based frame got off to a hot start with “Disease,” “Funky Bitch,” “Fluffhead,” then stagnated for the duration. Phish played everything perfectly fine, but chose a set of songs that didn’t go well together and the entire set kind of fell flat. “Ocelot” provided the high point of improvisation in a mellow opening half. A fine set of singles, nonetheless, the opening frame provided the necessary exhale after Utica to prepare the band to continue their mission after setbreak.

I: Down with Disease, Funky Bitch, Fluffhead, Roses Are Free, Rift, The Moma Dance, Ocelot, NICU, Sample in a Jar, Julius

II: Rock and Roll > Carini > My Problem Right There, Mike’s Song > Sanity > Weekapaug Groove, Suzy Greenberg, Light, Character Zero > Also Sprach Zarathustra > Loving Cup

E: First Tube

Tags: ,

The Past Meets The Future

Posted in Uncategorized with the tags , , on October 21st, 2010 by Mr.Miner

Official Utica Poster

In a show that shot us back in time both in setting and musical content, Phish played two unparalleled sets of music firmly rooted in history while stretching into the future, showing us that things are just beginning to hit stride for this era. Building off of their recent fall exploits, the band threw down a show that resembled none of this era in any way, shape, or form – an entire evening that felt plucked from the mid-’90s. With each passing night of tour it feels like we are witnessing a rebirth of Phish – the real Phish – the band that puts on mind-numbing shows like it’s their job. The one-brained, four-headed monster took the attack from moment one last night, creating two thematic frames of music that redefined what is possible in modern era Phish.

I’ve yet to tackle a show like this in words, and I feel like it may best be done without re-listening and simply giving my initial impression, because this one was an absolute shocker. Phish stepped in Utica Memorial Auditorium – the room MSG was modeled after – and took us on a journey that likened a night from ’94 or ’95 but with a completely modern musical vibe. With an eternally twisting path and white hot jamming throughout, Utica provided the two-set psychedelic adventure of everyone’s ideal Phish show. Navigating completely original improvisation with a retro feel, Phish took a huge step forward in this era last night, evoking their past mastery along the way. The present and the future came smashing together at Utica Memorial last night in what can only be considered a massive win for anyone with even a tangential care about the future of Phish music. So here we go…

12.29.09 (W.Rogell)

The night opened innocently enough with “My Soul” and “Stealing Time” before things turned crazy for the duration. Beginning with “Vultures” and ending with “Antelope,” Phish threw down a retro-style set full of  jamming, teases and transitions. Following a smoking rendition of “Vultures,” Phish cranked their creativity to eleven for the rest of the night, dropping into a “Wolfman’s” that transcended any version they’ve played this era. They didn’t just toy with loafing funk grooves, the systematically deconstructed the song in a series if mini-jams that brought the focus of the show squarely upon the band’s improvisation, a focus that would never waver in a game-changing night of music. Blending into “Cities,” the Talking Heads cover provided a splash landing of groove for their prior rhythmic acrobatics.

Utica Memorial Marquee

Once “Cities” ended, the thematic part of the set began with the shredding fall debut of “Guyute.” And from then on, the first set transformed into “Guyuitca,” as the anthem found its way seamlessly into each song for the rest of the frame. But more significantly, the music from here on out was on another level than we have seen this era. A mid-first set “Bowie,” (yes, you read that right) provided a ridiculous early peak to the show, and contained vicious improv. Morphing into segments of “Wilson-inspired” jamming, Phish blended the two songs in sinister fashion. During one of the sections, Trey repeated “Guyute’s line,”Bouncing Like A Newborn Elf” in an eerie tone over the groove. Phish was letting loose and we were only in the middle of the first set! Moving as one through criminally smooth soundscapes, Phish began the aural festivities early Tuesday night, but who knew where we were heading. Following the smashing rendition of “David Bowie” Phish dropped into the “Wilson” that had been teased throughout. And when the band got to the heavy metal part, Trey layered one of the peak lines of “Guyute” right into the mix. As this musical roller coaster moved on, we found ourselves in another rarity – “McGrupp.” A technically sound version captivated the intimate crown amidst this amazing first frame, and soon the band finished “McGrupp,” they started “I Saw It Again!” At this point the opening half was growing into an absurd spectacle – a trend that continued as Phish improvised out of “Saw It Again” into and ambient, “Guyute-laced” bridge into “Antelope.”

10.12.10 (S.Short)

I don’t know a how long its been since the band dropped an “Antelope” like they did last night. A song that had become predictable, always staying within its constraints, broke all boundaries in Utica as Phish took the jam into wide open, uncharted psychedelia. It sounded like we were safe and sound back in good ol’ 1995…but this was 2010! Phish is currently moving forwards and backwards simultaneously in some sort of time-space paradox, but it is happening right into front of our eyes – right now. Tearing apart “Antelope” like they haven’t in well over a decade, we were privileged to the set closer reestablish itself in full. When setbreak came people were fully freaking on the masterful nature of the opening frame, and there was nobody that disagreed. But if the audience was buzzing then, the second set caused a full on skull implosions for all in attendance.

10.12.10 (L.Hubbard)

“Drowned” ignited a fire in the second set as the palpable energy of the first half spilled right into the second set opener. The band engaged the audience with the uptempo piece as they set the table for quite the set of Phish. Pushing the thematic rock jam into a snarling percussive playground, the band carried a certain momentum through this jam, but as they were in full stride, Trey decided, coyly but abruptly, to change courses. But when that course leads into “Sand,” you’ll hear few gripes from me. Obviously liking what he heard in Charleston’s first set versions as much as we did, the band immediately inserted the song in the second set only two shows later. And boy did they give the groove vehicle the joyride last night, annihilating the rhythmic juggernaut in dynamic and diverse fashion. Boasting a subconscious communication throughout this jam, Phish brought a sweltering dance session to the already humid arena. Leading with confident and playful lead melodies, Red fully immersed himself in the the Mike and Fish’s thick pocket, creating a intense and jazzy feel to the driving piece.

A top notch “Theme” and a surprise “Axilla” set the table for an increasingly elusive “Birds of A Feather” that sparked the second half of the set. Each jam Phish dropped last night featured subliminally intricate interplay and was filled to the brim with dense ideas and high-speed collective improvisation. And “Birds” fit this description perfectly. After a short breath in “Tela,” Phish set up the sequence that sealed the deal in upstate New York. In a show defined by its unpredictability, when the band hit up another second set “Split,” they gave new meaning to the word.

11.18.09 (M.Stein)

Taking “Split” on a soul-searching odyssey, the band took the piece on a blissful escapade for the second straight time, but this one wound up quite differently than Broomfield’s highlight. Launched into the stratosphere with an ethereal jam that felt like floating through a fantasy, the music played the band as they took the piece on a spectacular ride landed quietly and unfinished in “Have Mercy.” (An extremely tactful use of The Mighty Diamonds cover as opposed to the last few times it has appeared.) The band surprised everyone as they moved out of roots vibe into another gorgeous piece of open jamming, begging the question if they would work their way back into “Split.” But with yet another curve ball, they gradually moved into the intro to another sonic jaunt, “Piper.”

Darting and dashing with lightening quickness the band progressed through several planes of torrid psychedelia as “Piper” provided an angular sprint through multiverses of sonic texture. Blowing out another wide open jam, the band found themselves organically landing in a “Birds Reprise” which they promptly out of back into the peak of “Split.” Combining mindfucking improv with setlist trickery, Phish found themselves in the show of life last night, living the moment and creating an musical adventure unseen this era. Capping the show in idyllic fashion with a slowly building “Slave,” Trey worked a melodic theme early in the jam which he toys with all the way to the top. After a particularly ripping “Good Times, Bad Times” encore, the show couldn’t have felt any more refreshing. Most stood soaking with sweat after the retro-futuristic Phish set, and nary has an entire crowd felt like that in ages. It really felt like it used to on the most intense nights, and it was a magic that had yet to be felt this era. Utica was, by any accounts of the overused descriptor, an epic Phish show.

Fall 2010

Perhaps these signature nights are best defined by the looks on fans’ faces after the show. As people spilled into the miniature town of Utica, eyes glowing and smiles gleaming, people mingled around the venue genuinely lost in vortex of what had just gone down. Every single person I spoke to after the show was on the same page; this shit brought this whole 3.0 era to the next level. It was hard to believe, but that show had really just happened. This fall, Phish is starting to revisit the contours of shows from decades ago, but with an increased collective skill level with which they are simply making their best music in eons. And each night it’s only getting better. As we hit the halfway point of tour, Fall 2010 is certainly living up to any expectations and moving right beyond them. Catch ‘em while you still can!

I: My Soul, Stealing Time From the Faulty Plan, Vultures, Wolfman’s Brother > Cities, Guyute, David Bowie*^, Wilson*, McGrupp and the Watchful Hosemasters, Saw It Again* > Run Like an Antelope*

II: Drowned > Sand > Theme From the Bottom, Axilla > Birds of a Feather, Tela, Split Open and Melt > Have Mercy > Piper > Birds Reprise > Split Open and Melt, Slave to the Traffic Light

E: Good Times Bad Times

* w/ “Guyute” quotes / teases, ^ with “Wilson” interludes

Tags: , ,

A Postcard From Maine

Posted in Uncategorized with the tags , on October 20th, 2010 by Mr.Miner

Official Augusta Poster

After a 420 mile drive (on the nose) from Augusta to Utica and a hearty Denny’s breakfast, last night’s full-on review will have to wait a bit. In short, Phish dropped a standout second set centered around an experimental “Light” in a gymnasium taken right out of the 1980s. Amidst a burly “Fuck Your Mike’s Groove,” Phish took “Light” into original realms, building on the revised jam format unveiled in Broomfield – improvising out of the main build into percussive and futuristic funkscapes rather than reprising the lyrics and leading the piece into ambient psychedelia. Stellar versions of “Bathtub Gin” and “Harry Hood” also highlighted the show, but the most spectacular part may have come in the encore of all places! Usually an afterthought, Phish came out and dropped a absolutely sublime and exploratory “Reba” that showcased the band’s most cohesive improv of the evening. Stopping in a brief “Manteca” tease out of a surreal sequence, the jaw-dropping highlight of the night came last – and that is a rarity. More to come in the day off – gotta catch a nap before this evening…

I: Chalk Dust Torture, Back on the Train, Torn and Frayed, Bathtub Gin, Gumbo, The Divided Sky, Jesus Just Left Chicago, Nellie Kane, 46 Days, Possum

II: Fuck Your Face > Mike’s Song* > Light > Twenty Years Later > Fast Enough for You, Weekapaug Groove, Halley’s Comet > Free, Harry Hood, Golgi Apparatus, A Day in the Life

E: Reba**, Backwards Down the Number Line

* w/ “Fuck Your Face” quotes at the beginning and end of the jam, ** w/ “Manteca” quote

Tags: ,