TTFM: December Jams 2.0

Posted in Uncategorized with the tags , on December 9th, 2013 by Mr.Miner
Reading 10.29.13 (Andrea Nusinov)

Reading 10.29.13 (Andrea Nusinov)

Piper” 12.29.03 II, Miami, FL

The standard against which all 2.0 “Pipers” should be measured. The short post-hiatus era were the true glory years for “Piper.”

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Runaway Jim -> Times Loves a Hero” 12.31.02 III, NYC, NY

The improvisational centerpiece of their comeback show.

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Wolfman’s Brother” 12.1.03 Albany, NY

A favorite of a couple friends, this one is in honor of Wade and Scotty B. Look out for the “butter” jam at the end.

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Ghost -> Free” 12.29.03 II, Miami, FL

This pairing provided the meat of a non-stop, second set sequence.

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Down with Disease” 12.30.13 II, Miami, FL

After a zany second set with both highs and lows, Phish stopped the antics on a dime and closed the show with a heart-wrenching “Disease.”

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Frankie Says” 12.28.03 I, Miami, FL

This is the stuff Phish pulled off in first sets in the post-hiatus era. Out of “Frankie Says” no less.” This was in the very first set of the New Years Run.

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Rock and Roll -> Weekapaug > Reprise” 12.2.03 II, Boston, MA

This unorthodox sequence opened the second set of the 20th anniversary show, ten years ago.

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Suzy Greenberg” 12.28.03 II, Miami, FL

The seemingly innocuous pop song turned into one of Trey’s darkest guitar confessionals in history.

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Stash” 12.31.03 II, Miami, FL

One of the finest post-hiatus jams, period

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Bathtub Gin -> 2001” 12.30 II, Miami, FL

This set-closing “2001″ foreshadowed P Funk’s second set sit in as Trey teases some classic Parliament licks.

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TTFT: Winter 2003

Posted in Uncategorized with the tags , , on February 21st, 2012 by Mr.Miner

8.6.11 - The Gorge (Graham.Lucas)

When Phish came back from their hiatus, the band played a mediocre New Year’s Run that left some fans wondering what was to come. But after two weeks in February, during which the band stepped up its game considerably, much of the community believed again. This was the only domestic winter or spring tour since 1994, and the frigid crossing of the nation brought a different feel to the two week journey. But each night, Phish’s playing warmed up the audiuence with increasingly creative playing and considerable on-stage risk taking. And by the end of the short tour, there were plenty of musical highlights to look back on. Enjoy these ten selections for this Tuesday, celebrating the band’s return to the road nine years ago.

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Mike’s Song > Free” 2.21 II

“Mike’s” still had girth when the band came back in 2003, as it opened this second set in Cincy—nine years ago today—with plenty of filthy grooves.

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Tweezer” 2.20 II

Though Nassau’s gem gets the most focus of any “Tweezer” from Winter ’03, this Chicago rendition—the first of tour—is a dissonant and diabolical ride.

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Piper” 2.16 II

This Vegas “Piper” highlighted a big weekend in Vegas that symbolized the true return of Phish to the community at large.

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Twist” 2.24 II

A dark horse ride to outer space from East Rutherford’s second set, though much of the crowd was already blues’d out by BB King’s first set marathon sit-in.

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Bathtub Gin” 2.22 II

One of the most original and cohesive jams of Winter Tour, as the band pushed into a nouveau ambient-Phishtronica.

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Stash -> Ghost” 2.26 II

This sequence was the improvisational centerpiece of the band’s returned to The Centrum in Worcester.

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Seven Below” 2.20 II

With the above “Tweezer,” this “Seven Below” jam anchored the second set at Rosemont.

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Down With Disease” 2.21 I

An often-overlooked jam that got things rocking quickly in the first set of four on a snowy weekend in Cincinatti.

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TTFF: Rewind—2003

Posted in Uncategorized with the tags , , on January 27th, 2012 by Mr.Miner

7.2.11 - Super Ball (Graham Lucas)

For this Friday’s playlist, we rewind to the often-debated “post-hiatus” era. Regardless of what side of that fence you come down on, I’m sure all can appreciate these gems from 2003. Featuring a grittier, uncompressed guitar tone and uncompromising dives into experimental and psychedelic playing, Phish took things deep during their second go-round. While some jams wound up more focused than others, I hope these selections can be appreciated by fans of any era. Enjoy the distinct, “post-hiatus” sound on this winter weekend! And check out the book offer below.

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Walls of the Cave -> Carini” 2.14.03 II, LA, CA

This monstrous jam emerged on the first night of winter tour ’03, restoring some faith after a less-than-impressive comeback run at MSG and Hampton.

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Wolfman’s -> Scents and Subtle Sounds” 7.7.03 II, Phx, AZ

This gooey “Wolfman’s” jam merged with the debut of “Scents” in the desert on the opening night of Summer ’03.

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Stash” 12.31.03 II, Miami, FL

The defining jam of the first New Year’s Run in Miami.

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Seven Below” 7.13.03 II, Quincy, WA

A harrowing exploration that I missed for a high school friend’s wedding. The wedding sucked and  I haven’t seen the guy since. Fail.

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Split -> Free” 7.22.03 II, Noblesville, IN

The centerpiece of night two in Deer Creek, and probably the most lasting piece of the run.

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Twist -> Simple” 11.29.03 II, Philadelphia, PA II

This jam provided one of few highlights of a rather uninspired Thanksgiving run.

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Ya Mar” 8.2.03 II, Limestone, ME

What’s happened to the occasional “Ya Mar” jam? Some, like this one from IT, used to go deep.

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Suzy Greenberg” 12.28.03 II, Miami, FL

Phish oozes out of “Suzy” into seething jam that centers on a darkly-spiritual guitar showcase by Trey.

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Harry Hood” 7.25.03 II, Charlotte, NC

Just when Phish was beginning to break down improvisational barriers with “Harry Hood” (see Camden ’03 also), they called in quits in ’04.

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Cover (Masthay)

Get a Signed Book Now!

In case you haven’t heard via Twitter or Facebook, we are currently in a 72-hour window in which you can order “The Book” and have it signed as well as inscribed with a Phish lyric. You get to choose the song. I get to choose the lyric. This offer remains open for any orders placed by Saturday night at 8 pm Pacific. Please leave a “note” in your PayPal order telling me your choice of song! If you forget to do that, you can email me at mrminer@phishthoughts.com, but the other way works far smoother. With Valentine’s Day  just around the corner, get a book inscribed to your significant other with a lyric that means something in your life! It will last far longer than chocolate and roses! Just an idea…

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A Post-Hiatus Playlist

Posted in Uncategorized with the tags , , on February 1st, 2010 by Mr.Miner

7.10.03 (A.Markarian)

Out of the many great Phish jams during the post-hiatus era, here are a couple of top-shelf selections.

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A Song I Heard the Ocean Sing” 6.19.04 II SPAC

Evoking the feel of Pink Floyd’s psy-rock, this piece of improv is among my favorite regardless of era. A truly masterful excursion, this song needs to find itself back into rotation come summer.

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Scents and Subtle Sounds” 7.30.03 I Camden

Arguably the most impressive version ever played – it would certainly get my vote – this “Scents” highlighted the first set in one of the band’s most impressive post-hiatus’ outing.

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7-15-03 - USANA Amphitheatre

7-15-03 - USANA Amphitheatre

Mr. Completely > Low Rider” 7.15.03 II West Valley, Utah

In one of ’03s out-of-the-way and undersold shows, Phish debuted Trey’s longtime TAB classic, “Mr. Completely,” and with it came a furious half-hour of non-stop groove.

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Twist” 6.20.04 II SPAC

Another interstellar jam from Phish’s last stand.

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Seven Below” 7.13.03 II The Gorge

One of the first psychedelic masterpieces of the summer and  legitimate tour highlight when all was said and done.

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7.25.03 - Charlotte, NC (Alex)

Harry Hood” 7.25.03 II Charlotte, NC

A ground-breaking jam for “Harry Hood” illustrating the band’s exploratory spirit that underlines these years. A piece that once you hear you will never forget.

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DOWNLOAD OF THE DAY:

9.18.99 Coors Amphitheatre, Chula Vista, CA < Torrent

9.18.99 Coors Amphitheatre, Chula Vista, CA < Megaupload

An outdoor affair that started in the dark amidst the Southern California desert; this standout show goes out via reader request to Christine!

I: Tweezer > Roses Are Free > Wilson, Maze, Brian and Robert, Tube, Rocky Top

II: Boogie On Reggae Woman, Meatstick, Free, Bouncing Around the Room, Harry Hood, Frankenstein, Cavern

E: Contact, Tweezer Reprise

Source: Schoeps cmc6/mk4v > Apogee AD-1000 @ 48k

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Fun In the Sun – The Finale

Posted in Uncategorized with the tags , , on December 26th, 2009 by Mr.Miner

12.31.03

12.31.03 - Miami (Unknown

New Years’ Eve – one of the most circled days of the Phish calendar. Throughout their career, the band has played several defining shows while sitting on the brink of January 1. New Year’s 1993, 1995, and 1998 jump right out as high points of the band’s year-end parties, leaving Big Cypress in a league of its own. Upping the stakes with three sets, a tradition started back in day, New Year’s Eve is the proverbial cherry on top; the icing of the four-night cake. While the first three nights usually provide the dark meat of the run, New Year’s Eve generally carries a more festive vibe. In Miami ’03, the excitement bubbled on December 31 just a bit more vigorously than usual, because other than 2002′s mediocre MSG comeback, the band prepared for their first full-scale New Year’s Eve since Big Cypress.

12.31.03 (Max Z.)

Phish responded right off the bat, starting off the last night of 2003 with the final minute of “Wilson” that they sidestepped with their opening transition into “Sand” the night before. Beginning the show with “Blap! Boom!…,” Phish tore into the final peak of “the song,” blending directly into the opening lick of “Mike’s.” Another bombastic opener, the band had now ignited the Miami shows with “Bowie,” “Piper,” “Wilson > Sand,” and “Wilson > Mike’s.” With a relatively standard run through the darkness, Phish got bodies moving immediately. Trey led with sustained melodies, warming up with a serious solo that drove this version. Struggling through several parts of “Hydrogen,” the band rejoined the same musical page as they dipped into a “Weekapaug,” fully loaded with traditional “Auld Lang Syne” teases that further amped the crowd for the midnight entrance into 2004. Though this “Weekapuag” went all over the place without any coherent structure, Trey provided a barely-audible vocal tease of “Jungle Boogie,” hinting at the cover that would open the third set.

12.31.03 (Ben)

"Jungle Boogie" - 12.31.03 (B.Linus)

With a whole lot of energy, but not much on-point improv, New Years’ Eve was underway. Stepping into a more simplistic piece, Phish followed up the opening suite with a safe journey through “The Moma Dance.” The momentum built over the first couple of nights had steadily worn off, as the band’s playing through the opening frame left something to be desired. Inexplicably, they selected one of their toughest compositions, “Guyute” to continue the set. As ESPN’s Chris Berman would say, they “Rumbled, bumbled, and stumbled” all the way through the piece, continuing the bumpy ride before completing the stanza with sub-standard fare in “YEM” and “First Tube.” Sprinkling in another dash of setlist creativity, the band moved from the peak of “First Tube” into the conclusion of the unfinished “Tube” from the night before. Stepping off stage after a lackluster set, Phish seemed to be losing the harness they had on their music for the first couple shows. But when they came back on for set two, the most awe-inspiring piece of the entire run would unfold.

12.31.03 (Unknown

The Miami “Stash.” If one was around in these days, the version needs no introduction. Retaking their firm hold over their improvisational chops, the band unleashed one of the defining jams of the post-hiatus era. Melting into the song’s canvas, the band settled into a near-silence to get started. The entire band illustrated a greater cohesiveness in the first few minutes of this piece than they did through the entire first set. Responding to each others’ subtleties, Phish invoked a precise musical interaction. Lifting off into an abstract excursion, the unique quality of this jam can not be overstated, and words would simply get in the way. Moving through darkness into sublime harmonies, Phish tapped into something greater on this occasion; one of those special times they channeled the outer universe. Getting into stunning ambient planes, Phish crafted a jam that will always bring chills with its memory. Language fails in instances of trying to convey the inexpressible, and this “Stash” was one of these deeply spiritual quests that people drive from sea to shining sea chasing down. Building out of heavenly textures, Trey brought the band back towards “Stash” with a prominent “Mind Left Body” tease that the band briefly latched onto before rejoining their original course, soaring into final peak to the actual “Stash” jam. Following this near-half-hour of soulful psychedelia, many looked up, aghast at the depths just reached. After a sloppy opening set, Phish came out and unveiled an other-worldly adventure that left people talking far after the show ended. Another example of the massive musical risks that defined this era, this “Stash” proved a spiritual cleansing that underlined the religious nature of the band’s most profound adventures.

Set III Theatrics - 12.31.03 (Unknown

This “Stash” brought the band’s crowning Miami moment, and though “Seven Below” continued with a strong follow-up jam, the show would musically fade from there. The set’s closing “Chalkdust > Slave > Chalkdust” felt completely forced for setlist entertainment, with two abrupt changes. And the third’s set marching band theatrics to ring in the New Year didn’t do much to salvage the music that came after. Though exploratory and moving through some unique segments, “Runaway Jim” meandered for a large part of the post-midnight jam. And to be honest, I don’t remember the “Reba” or the “Antelope” that came later in the set; and to me, that speaks volumes.

Page and The Bunnies (J.Pinsky)

New Year’s third sets are rarely musically astounding. Representing the down-swing for the band, these final frames always seem like party time more than any earnest endeavor. By the time their ninth set in four days has come, more often than not the band’s focus has checked out. Though often filled with feel-good Phish, not since 1995 has Phish done something both creative and astounding in a New Year’s set; not that there’s anything wrong with that. The entire New Year’s show is generally an anti-climax, with the best music of the run almost exclusively coming over the previous nights. But who can beat a three set Phish party for New Year’s Eve? There’s no place I’d rather be.

Nobody knew it, but Phish would be gone only two seasons after Miami, disappearing into the mid-summer night. What seemed to be the re-ignition of a hallowed tradition became a one-and-done affair. But what a difference six years makes. Now, one day from our return to American Airlines Arena, the community is laced with a sense of joy and confidence in the future. With a vastly brighter landscape, Miami circa 2009 seems to be something that 2003 turned out not to be – a bold step into a limitless future. Gather your personal belongings, the ride is about to begin.

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Jams of the Day:

Stash” 12.31.03 II

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Tweezer > Cities ” 12.31.98 II

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DOWNLOAD OF THE DAY:

12.31.96 Fleet Center, Boston, MA SBD < Torrent

12.31.96 Fleet Center, Boston, Ma SBD < Megaupload

12.31.96 - Boston (Doug)

I: Axilla, Peaches en Regalia, Punch You In the Eye, Cars Trucks Buses, Stash, The Horse > Silent in the Morning, The Divided Sky, Sample in a Jar, Tweezer Reprise

II: Chalk Dust Torture, Wilson, Sparkle, Simple > Swept Away > Steep > Harry Hood > Prince Caspian, Character Zero

III: Also Sprach Zarathustra > Auld Lang Syne > Down with Disease, Suzy Greenberg, Run Like an Antelope, Bohemian Rhapsody*, Julius**

E: Amazing Grace**

*Phish debut; w/ Boston Community Choir
**w/ Boston Community Choir

Source : FM SBD

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Fun In the Sun – Part Deux

Posted in Uncategorized with the tags , on December 23rd, 2009 by Mr.Miner

12.29.03 (M.Collins)

12.29.03 (M.Collins)

12.29.03

The night turned to day and then back to night, and before we knew it, we were back inside American Airlines Arena for night two. Phish wasted no time, starting right where they left off after the scintillating show the previous night. Much like “Bowie’s” beginning to the 28th, the band kicked off the 29th already in high gear, opening with a wide open jam in “Piper.” Starting off shows with colossal jams is one thing, but opening with this level of unbridled fury was straight up mind-bending. As if the guys never left the stage, Phish tore into a passionate piece, likening its own force of nature; a proverbial sixth element. In a summation of the countless cosmic chases that “Piper” provided throughout 2003, this opener had people holding onto their seats (think Maxell-XL II cases) trying to not get bowled over by the overwhelming intensity that shot from the stage in a sonic laser beam. Holding nothing back, Trey wailed like this was his last chance to ever play guitar, pouring every drop of emotion through his instrument, while delving deep into his arsenal of trickery. With knee-buckling lead lines, creative phrasing, and fierce rhythm chops, Trey put on a clinic for twenty straight minutes; not to mention his band mates, who were right there with him. Crafting diverse patterns and backdrops for Red to color with his aggressive work, Phish built one of the indelible jams of the weekend. With a menacing musical hose, the band washed down the audience with sheets of psychedelia, and the show had barely begun. Without concern for anything outside of the moment, the band grew this “Piper” into an improvisational trapeze act before dismounting with both feet firmly on the ground.

12.29.03 (Unk)

12.29.03 (Unk)

After such a celestial initiation, the band toned things down for the rest of the set. But when the second half got underway, Phish began a musical stanza including five songs strung together coherently, all with natural transitions: “Rock and Roll > Twist > Boogie On > Ghost > Free.” This fifty-minute curve of creativity carried a more upbeat vibe than the 28th’s plunge into the abyss, providing more than enough dance music along the way. Though none of the first three jams developed into individual monsters, the on-point communication and their fluid musical connection made up for any lack of depth. Many cite this segment as the highlight of the entire run, and while that is certainly debatable, it is an unquestionable Miami highlight, and a more-than-engaging passage of music.

12.29.03 - Miami (Unk)

12.29.03 (Unk)

The essential part of this sequence came with its finale, “Ghost > Free.” A popular combination ever since “Ghost’s” inception, this incarnation of the well-documented pairing brought the show to an undeniable peak.  Launching into a careful exploration, the band left their all-out aggression for a more intricate version that featured full-band interplay throughout. Gradually building into more searing offerings rather than any funk-based licks, Trey, with Fishman, pushed this “Ghost” from its mellow incarnation into a surreal groove. As Mike and Page locked into the pattern, the band hit a galloping stride, gaining momentum for an explosive second half of the jam.  Sustaining a more aggressive palette for the duration, the band slowly upped the cosmic residue, giving way to “Free.”

12.29.03 (Unk)

A syrupy version of the song plodded at a methodical pace, while Trey toyed with the top half of the groove. As the piece progressed, Trey and Mike engaged in a duel, trading licks back and forth, and weaving their lines around each others, before crashing back into bombastic textures. The audience appreciated this unique take on “Free,” responding with enthusiasm. Getting somewhat crossed up during their final interchange, the band, nonetheless, continued pushing the envelope, coming up with new angles on old songs. And once “Free” growled to a halt, concluding the near-hour long adventure, the band heard it from the crowd in droves, appreciating the twisting nature of the trek.

12.29.03 (M.Collins)

The crowd energy remained high through the end of the show, beckoning the band to come out for two separate encores of “Waste” and “Coil.” Having crafted two heavy hitters in a row, Phish sat halfway through an enticing New Years Run that had begun to shape up significantly. The next two nights would provide some eternal highlights, but neither show, in their entirety, would hold up to the first four sets of Florida Phish.

*****

12.30.03

12.30.03 (Unk)

With energy as high as possible following two top-notch evenings, the sky seemed to be the limit as Phish stepped onto stage on December 30th. The first set carried the same intensity and imagination as the previous two nights, but in the second frame Phish finally lost their snowballing momentum, inviting George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic to join them in what turned into a musical fiasco.

But the first set kept the Phish train rolling with a raucous opening of  “Wilson,” which slid, unfinished, into the only “Sand” of the post-hiatus era. Taking the rhythmic vehicle for an urgent mission, the band moved through the dance textures with focus. An ideal selection for the free-flowing nature of  their exploration of the era, Phish matched song and style impeccably, breaking out a piece that once seemed omnipresent. Coyly introducing the “Shafty” melody right into the full-on groove, Trey led the band in a patient and tasteful transition of the sorts that have been so elusive these days. Chugging into the bass-driven groove, for the  third night in a row, the band locked their seat belts and jumped into the fray mere minutes after the opening bell. Blending right into “NICU,” the band sported a playful attitude from the very start of the evening, a vibe that would permeate the entire show.

"2001" 12.30.03 (Unk)

After a string of bust-outs, including the liquid funk of “Cities” and the crazed bluegrass of “Scent of a Mule,” Phish capped the set in the same energetic fashion that it began. The opening notes of “Bathtub Gin” fired up the arena, but after some rocky parts through the composition and beginning of the jam, it took an awkwardly patient build to arrive at a real pocket. But when the band finally got there, they took off into some unique collaborative playing. Certainly not the highlight of the show, Phish salvaged the piece, moving to darker and groovier places, eventually setting the table for an ambient entrance into “2001.”

Able to let precision fall by the wayside and just groove, Phish closed the set with a series of looser funk patterns. Trey teased “Bathtub Gin” throughout the first musical verse, while foreshadowing the upcoming set with fully-quoted P. Funk melodies throughout the second. A solid frame that didn’t boast the tightness of the first two nights came to an exciting close, and regardless of the small step back, spirits remained high.

Phish and P. Funk - 12.30.03 (Unk)

The Parliament sit-in could be described in only two ways – “You had to be there,” or “an absolute debacle.” Whichever description one chooses to use, the guest spot stole a crucial twenty minutes from the middle of the second set, and absolutely derailed the band’s momentum they had built over the first two nights. When Clinton’s crew finally left the stage, more than a few fans were left scratching their heads. What could have been fun and quick, turned out to be boring and drawn out, as Phish took a backseat to the Funkadelic entourage.

12.30.03 - Miami (Unk)

Nonetheless, the band book-ended the second set with two fierce pieces of improv – “Tube” and “Down With Disease.” Opening any second set with “Tube” is like an adrenaline shot directly to the heart, and this extended version provided just that. With melodic guitar leads over an infectious groove, Trey brought a different feel to this jam. Coming out of a rhythmic breakdown where the band re-built the layers of the song, Trey came screaming in like a joker, cackling with menacing laughter, leading a section of candy groove. Phish soon infused their style of the time into the funk vehicle, moving into more dissonant psychedelia. Pushing into a dirtier place, Trey busted out his best Jim Morrison in a creative, but not-so-successful take on “LA Woman.” Stretching out the messy cover, the band made a necessary and abrupt change into “Birds.” Only halfway through, this set already seemed a bit off. Trey and George’s setbreak party probably didn’t help the situation either.

12.30.03 (J.Dorans)

But before the set came to a disastrous close, the band pulled it together, playing a powerfully emotive “Down With Disease.” Seemingly sensing their lackluster frame, the band made sure to slay their last jam of the night, taking the high-speed rock and roll piece on a cathartic jaunt. Out of the structured jam, Phish stepped into a segment of darker, gnarling interplay, but the piece’s defining moments soon began when the band pushed into dark ambient space. Trey used soulful melodies to gently caress the soundscape, and before long, the band converged in one of those moments of palpable magic. An amorphous jam united all members in a fragile musical glow, and they emerged with a segment of music that whispered directly to our souls. With utmost delicacy, Trey layered the “Disease” melody into the mix, bringing the band on a thematic climb through some of the most precious moments of the weekend; a triumph of the highest degree. Often overlooked at the end of this set, this one is a genuine diamond in the rough.

A set that represented both the successes and pitfalls on on-stage risk-taking, the 30th didn’t hold up to the previous two nights; but such is the nature of improvisational music. And despite some on-stage antics, there were more than a few high points that carried the show. It was back to the beach for one more day before New Year’s Eve’s three-set extravaganza; and the best jam of the weekend had yet to unfold.

To Be Continued…

=====

Jam of the Day:

“Down With Disease” 12.30.03 II

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DOWNLOAD OF THE DAY

11.21.09 The Crown, Cincinatti, OH < Torrent

11.21.09 The Crown, Cincinatti, OH < Megaupload

11.21.09 (W.Rogell)

Oops! Forgot one of the best from the Fall.  “Rock and Roll > Ghost > If I Could” and “Split” are all keepers. And the “Antelope” is short, but smoking. All of fall will be in the archive soon after the new year.

I: Wilson, NICU, Wolfman’s Brother, Ocelot, Torn and Frayed, Strange Design, Ginseng Sullivan, Albuquerque, Split Open and Melt, Dirt, Limb By Limb, Run Like an Antelope

II: Rock and Roll > Ghost > If I Could, Backwards Down the Number Line, Prince Caspian, Suzy Greenberg, 2001 >The Squirming Coil

E: Sleeping Monkey, Axilla

Source: Schoeps mk22 > KCY> Schoeps VMS02IB > Apogee Mini-Me > SD 722 (@24bit/96kHz)

Tags: ,

Fun In the Sun – Pt. 1

Posted in Uncategorized with the tags , on December 22nd, 2009 by Mr.Miner
12.28.03 Miami (J.Pinsky)

12.28.03 - Miami (J.Pinsky)

Phish’s last visit to Miami came at the end of the triumphant year of 2003. Only two and a half years after their hiatus, Phish returned to the road teeming with wild creativity. Essentially jamming their faces off, over their extensive summer tour, every show became a blast into the unknown. Armed with new vehicles and destroying old ones, the band impressed many fans with their nightly explorations, while others seemed turned off by the wide open, risk-centric playing. Sometimes meandering, but always experimenting, the band reached yet another creative peak in 2003, pushing jams further and further to places they had never been before.

12.28.03 (J.Pinsky)

A new “ambient” sound emerged almost immediately in the winter of ’03, and developed throughout their extensive summer tour.  Their new direction featured spacier and more layered textures than characterized the amorphous “ambient” playing of ’98. More often than not, jams took a turn for the dark side, akin to four mad scientists inventing new formulas on the fly. With a clear focus on improvisational adventure,  Summer ’03 represented a super-fueled, ridiculously engaging period of the band’s career. After listening through these nights so many times over, I’ve, literally, never understood a Phish fan not liking this era. Bottom line, the band tried new things nightly, and next to Summer ’95, 2003 represents the most outwardly psychedelic period of the band’s career. The groove-based playing that had dominated the end of their first career was left behind while new songs, old and new, opened up in brand new directions.  And Phish jammed ferociously night after night.

12.28.03 (J.Pinsky)

If comparing the band’s improvisation in their comeback years alone, 2003 blows 2009 out of the water, reaching planes the band hasn’t approached this year. The key difference is that 2010 is looking a hell of a lot better than 2004! Having taken things slowly this time around, Phish will be arriving at the future very soon, while in 2003, the band dove deep immediately, eventually self-destructing. But I am a firm proponent of the opinion that the jams never suffered on the way down; they only got more creative.

With only four relatively lackluster “Turkey Run” shows separating Summer from Miami, the sun beckoned all as Phish announced the first-ever four-night  New Years Run outside the Northeast. Ever since the band started doing New Years Runs in the early-90′s, they were affairs renowned for bitter cold, huge snowfalls, and wintry conditions. But in 2003 everyone traded in their parkas for bathing suits, and scarfs for shorts, taking the party to the ideal destination of Miami, Florida. Pools, frozen drinks, beaches, and sun by day and Phish and Miami by night, there was no denying that the formula trumped driving around up and down the salted highways of I-95.

12.28

When entering American Airlines Arena on the 28th, everyone found the basketball-only arena more intimate than expected. With a shorter floor, and seats that went up more than out, everyone seemed to be on top of the stage. Notoriously laid back security ran the show for all four nights, as the community took reign over the south Florida venue.

12.28.98 (J.Pinsky)

12.28.03 (J.Pinsky)

Stepping into a new room for the first time, one figured Phish would acclimate themselves to their environment before digging deep, but not this time. Coming out for the first of eight sets, the band slowly built an eerie spacescape to open the entire run. So much for warming up! And after moving through this dark intro, the band dropped into “David Bowie.” At this point, everyone sensed something special in the air; as the  four nights unfolded, everyone’s senses would be confirmed. Unleashing their fury like Hurricane Andrew, Phish attacked Miami early and often. Separated by only “Sample,” the band let loose on a laid back, swanky “Tweezer” that continued the instantaneous full-band interplay. Jumping into a melodic corridor, Trey led the troops with well-phrased melodies out of the gate, as Page added spacey effects behind the bulbous backing. Within the first half an hour of the four-night run we taking full-on “Bowies” and “Tweezers” to the dome like Glass Joe. Taking no time to get into the thick of it, the band continued with some of the run’s most cohesive psychedelia out of the late-set “Frankie Sez.” Blowing out jams like there was no tomorrow, Phish created at atmosphere of excitement and unknown before anyone had a chance to realize what had hit them. Punctuating the first set of the run with “Tweezer Reprise,” people were a bit more wide-eyed than usual when the lights came on for setbreak.

12.28.98 (J.Pinsky)

12.28.03 (J.Pinsky)

The non-stop explorations continued into the second frame, opening with the holiday-grooves of “Jibboo.” Exploding with crystalline dance patterns, Phish spun the room into a ball of bliss before dropping into a rather sinister piece of improv out of “Suzy Greenberg!?” Morphing from the song into a heavy metal journey into the eye of the monster, Phish unleashed their some of their most menacing music of the year. Exploiting his uncompressed tone, Trey growled with terror as the band sunk deep into a swamp of insanity. This type of jam is why 2003 Phish is fucking great, relentlessly pursuing the source with unending layers of psychedelic sorcery. Showcasing some of the most mind-bending guitar work you’ll ever hear from Trey, this was the man screaming from his soul; a rare guitar confessional. One of the defining moments of Miami, not to mention 2003, Trey rarely takes liberty to expose this side of himself  so deeply. It was a humbling privilege to be a part of – seriously. Leaving the audience in silence and absolute awe, Phish bled into an ambient soundscape. Continuing to choose each note passionately, Trey added subtle melody to the dissonance, and at the end of a  twenty-minute odyssey, the band splashed into the cool waters of “Theme.”

American Airlines Arena *(J.Pinsky)

AA Arena - Miami, FL (J.Pinsky)

Annihilating their landing point, Phish crushed anything in their path on this night, setting the tone for the following three. Culminating the set with “Harry Hood,” the band continued to take the typically happy jam outside the box. Entering some scorching places before rejoining the song’s theme, the whole band built to a dizzying peak. Climaxing a dream-like set, “Hood” put an exclamation point on a show that, contained two sets of full-on improv; in effect, two second sets.

Reveling in the neon glow outside the venue, an electricity pierced the warm winter air. Phish set the bar incredibly high, a bar they wouldn’t quite reach for the rest of the run. But if one thing seemed for sure, Phish would try their best to rip every pitch out of the park. And over the next three nights, they’d hit more than a few home runs.

To be continued…

=====

Jam of the Day:

“Suzy Greenberg > Theme” 12.28.03 II

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=====

DOWNLOAD OF THE DAY:

12.28.95 The Centrum Worcester, MA < Torrent

12.28.95 The Centrum Worcester, MA < Megaupload

With all the shows of fall having been posted, let’s turn our attention to New Years Runs of the past.

I: Split Open and Melt, Gumbo, The Curtain > Julius, Guyute, Horn, Rift, Fast Enough for You, Possum

II: Timber, Theme From the Bottom, Wilson, Buried Alive > Tweezer > I Didn’t Know, Uncle Pen, Slave to the Traffic Light

E: Fee, Tweezer Reprise

Source: Schoeps CMC64 (split 10 ft, OTS) > Stewart BPS-1 power supplies > Sony TDC-D7

Tags: ,

The History of Tweezer > 2001

Posted in Uncategorized with the tags , , , , on July 8th, 2009 by Mr.Miner
6.6.09 (D.Vann)

6.6.09 (D.Vann)

Song combinations and segues can make Phish sets infinitely more exciting, while opening up universes of improvisational possibility.  When an open ended jam finally arrives at a landing point which, itself, is another launch pad, things can get dirty.  We all go to Phish shows for different reasons, but if you’re into the psychedelic dance party aspect of things, there is no more lethal of a one-two punch than “Tweezer > 2001.”  Merging one of their most exploratory jams and a subsequent clinic in groove,  you’ve got yourself a chunky half hour of Phish.

This vigorous adventure has only been traveled three times in the band’s history- and interestingly, twice at Deer Creek.  However, the first-and mother- of all “Tweezer >2001s” hails from Christiania, Copenhagen, and was born on 7.1.98 in a dank stone barn called Den Gra Hal.  Aside from June’s Noblesville excursion- one of the mightiest segments of the tour- the only other time that Phish brought the two epics together was on the first night of three in the cornfields during the summer of ’03.  Read about, and listen to, all three below.

***

7.1.98 Christiana, Copenhagen

Den Gra Hal, Summer '98

Den Gra Hal, Summer '98

This forty-minute monster that dominated the show’s second set has always lived large in Phish lore.  Taking the intimate Scandinavian crowd on a journey like never before, Phish carefully crafted one of the quintessential highlights of the late ’90s.  Built in 1891 for the Danish military, and converted into a concert hall by hippies that created Christiania Freetown in the 1970s, Den Gra Hal made a surreal room for this trip.  To no more than a thousand fans, Phish masterfully played one of the definitive improvisational segments of 1998.  The band flowed through endless sections of collaborative rhythmic playing, as Trey switched back and forth from lead to rhythm and Page led the jam as much as anyone.  Mike and Fish owned the bottom end- Summer ’98 style.

Totally locked and shredding one of the hottest dance parties ever thrown, Phish took this “Tweezer” on an extensive ride through galaxies of groove, finally settling into a more mellow portion of music.  From here the band waded into minutes of beautifully murky and quieter music that built tremendous musical tension, only to be unleashed by Fishman’s snare hit.  Confined within a small room, this “2001″ took on a whole different character than its larger-than-life brethren.  Featuring far more notes with less space to travel, Trey, Mike and Page were cemented together, bouncing their funked-out musings off of each others’.  The interplay between Page and Trey was particularly sublime. Laid back, yet simultaneously driving, this version is certainly up there on any “best of” list.  Fishman just crushes the entire segment holding it down like only he can.  Honestly, this was one of my top Phish experiences ever.

LISTEN TO 7.1.98 “TWEEZER > 2001″ NOW!

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***

7.21.03 Deer Creek, IN

Deer Creek '03

Deer Creek '03

For five years, the legend of “Tweezer > 2001″ grew with every spin of those DATs.  With so few people there having actually bore witness, it became almost a piece of Phish mythology.  Through the many tours the band played, never again did this combination pop up- until after their hiatus in 2003.  In Phish’s return to the summer circuit, they pulled into Deer Creek for a three-night stand in late July, and midway through the second set, crawling out of a dark “46 Days” jam twisted the opening lick of “Tweezer.”

This time around, the entire episode was far more succinct, as the combo was shorter than Christiania’s “Tweezer.”  Right out of the gates, Trey hopped on his horse, leading the band with some standard “Tweezer leads.  As he began to improvise, the rest of the band remained largely anchored to the song’s composed structure.  Finally, Fishman started up a percussive beat that shook things up, leading into several minutes of minimalist improv.  As the band methodically chugged away, bridging the music to a smaller place, the jam didn’t turn into anything terribly interesting.  Taking the band out of their meandering, Fishman rode his cymbal into the intro of “2001.”  With a version that was nothing more than lazy funk, I felt as though this “Tweezer > 2001″ should not have been able to be called “Tweezer > 2001″- it didn’t deserve to carry the title!  Nonetheless, this was the second-ever combination of the two songs, part of a relatively forgettable opening night of three.

LISTEN TO 7.21.03 “TWEEZER > 2001″ NOW! (listen only)

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***

6.19.09 Deer Creek, IN

6.19.09 Deer Creek (D.Vann)

6.19.09 Deer Creek (D.Vann)

Phish was done; the combo had only happened twice- and only once for real.  And then the whole unretirement happened.  Just as extra innings is often referred to as “free baseball,” we all of a sudden had “free Phish!” And so the story goes…

The band pulled back into Deer Creek this June, almost five years later, underneath a canopy of intense lightening.  Having thrown down a nasty first half of the set in “Oceans > Drowned > Twist,” the band ended “Let Me Lie” with a roar into “Tweezer!”  With Alpine infamous for hosting “Tweezers,” and so much improv having gone down already- by June ’09 standards- I never saw it coming.  But all of a sudden, a bomb exploded in the pavilion as the crowd was engulfed by the mid-set favorite.

Deer Creek (D.Vann)

Deer Creek (D.Vann)

Entering the jam with some outright rhythm grooves, the band loosened their chops in preparation to devour the improv.  Carrying the momentum of their best set of tour, the band did not hold back, swimming into smooth, yet forceful, dance rhythms with precision.  You could feel the energy leap off the stage as the band crushed this spirited rendition, making their way beyond “Tweezer’s” conventions and into a blissful plane.  Settling into ambient textures, this wasn’t like the other ambient jams of tour- this had “2001″ written all over it.  Phish prepared to take launch.

Smashing into a series of late-set dance grooves, “2001′s” dynamic funk provided a stark contrast to the previous Noblesville incarnation, as it burst with energy and purpose.  It was a classic whiffle ball “do-over” for their lackluster performance in ’03, and completely surreal to be basking in the third ever “Tweezer > 2001,” this time in 2009!  Who would have thunk it?

No one knows if the band will ever choose to combine these two songs again, but between Chritiania’s sacred odyssey and Deer Creek’s jiggawatt-inspired throwdown, we now have two shining relics for the vault.

LISTEN TO 6.19.09 “TWEEZER > 2001″ NOW!

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*Note: I totally forgot about Albany’ ’03s “Tweezer > 2001″- which says something about its quality. Regardless, sorry for the oversight!

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1stbirthdaycakeHAPPY BIRTHDAY PHISH THOUGHTS!

It has been brought to my attention (Thanks Matso!) that today, July 9th, is the one year anniversary of Phish Thoughts!  Happy Birthday!! Thanks to all the readers and contributors who have turned this site into an incredible online community! Here is a link to my inaugural post!

-

=====

DOWNLOAD OF THE DAY:

6.20.09 Alpine Valley, East Troy, WI < TORRENT

6.20.09 Alpine Valley, East Troy, WI < MEGAUPLOAD

Official Alpine 6.20 Poster

Official Alpine 6.20 Poster

Here we have the first show at Alpine Valley, and final show of our run through June’s initial leg of summer tour.  A distinctly old school first set got the audience revved up for a second set that fell a bit flat.  An enjoyable time nonetheless.

I: Punch You in the Eye, Runaway Jim, Stash, Ya Mar, Bathtub Gin, Kill Devil Falls, Train Song, Farmhouse, Sparkle, Run Like An Antelope

II: Waves > Sample In A Jar, Maze, Makisupa Policeman, Ghost > The Lizards, You Enjoy Myself > NICU, Prince Caspian > Waste, Fire

E: Character Zero

Source: Schoeps mk41

Tags: , , , ,

The First Time

Posted in Uncategorized with the tags , , on April 23rd, 2009 by Mr.Miner
7.26.03 Atlanta

7.26.03 Atlanta

There is nothing quite like being at a Phish show when they play a brand new improvisational song.  I’m not talking about the live debut of a track that has already been released on an album- I mean a song that no one has ever heard before- period.  We get so used to Phish’s regular song rotation, that when they unfold a new beast right before out eyes, the experience can be quite powerful.  Traditionally debuting songs at beginning, and often in the first show, of a tour, Phish is never shy in getting their new material into their setlists.  The power of hearing a polished piece with a new jam for the first time can be one of the greatest thrills.  In Phoenix, the first show of Summer ’03, the band gave us one of those moments.

7.25.03 Charlotte

7.25.03 Charlotte

Following an awkward four night comeback run over MSG and Hampton, and a better winter tour, Phish had four months to prepare for summer tour, and prepare they did.  Coming out with a typically odd first set of tour at Cricket Pavilion, the second is where our story begins.  Second set openers generally go two ways-  a short introductory song that leads into something big, or, more often than not, a song that develops a significant jam itself.  This time, it was the latter.  Phish dropped a gooey-thick “Wolfman’s” to open the set, and to get the summer going in earnest.  Moving along with more pace and intent than most versions, this “Wolfman’s” complemented the sweltering summer evening.  As the jam progressed, the band retained as much respect for the space in the music as they had for any of their notes, resulting in an interesting “minimalist” type jam.

Moving into darker, slower, and more layered psychedelia, Phish began opening another door underneath the desert stars.  Gordon and Page added overtly mind-melting effects to Fish’s sparse beat and Trey’s melodies turned into sound effects.  Having moved from the liquid dance floor into the lair of the beast, the band took us deep on a journey into a sonic dungeon.

7.22.03 Deer Creek

7.22.03 Deer Creek

As all of the band’s effects morphed into a collective dissonance, out of the murk Trey began to delicately narrate a musical fairytale. The band subtly joined in, Fish wish an eerie beat, and as the lyrics began, they sounded like secret instructions.  Perfectly fitting the verse with their accompaniment, Phish created a magical aura of a fantasy land with the beginning of “Scents and Subtle Sounds,” and the lyrics were so clear and poignant.  Like opening the wardrobe, Trey sang:

If you would only start to live
One moment at a time
You would, I think, be startled
By the things that you would find.

Wrapping up their psychedelic verse with,”For if you do it right / You’ll find the moment never ends,” they hit a transition into a completely new part of the song.  With searing guitar licks, and meticulous composition, this piece was providing one of those moments its lyrics described.  It was like dancing to magic; something you’d never heard before engulfing your soul, and as the vibrant lyrics led us into the void, the improv was an overdose of bliss.

7.26.03 Atlanta

7.26.03 Atlanta

As the band layered their mystical vocals at the onset of the jam, it felt as though we were ascending to heaven.  To hear something so utterly gorgeous that had never touched our ears was completely overwhelming in the most amazing way.  Like opening up a new universe, the band crafted an uplifting and driving jam that oozed spirituality.  It’s not every day that Phish debuts a piece of music with the power and grace of “Scents,” so when you’ve seen the band for years and a brand new dynamic piece of music leaps off the stage the way it did that night in Phoenix, you are left staggered; sucker-punched by your own quest for the ultimate.  And there is nothing better.

Considering Phish’s album isn’t finished yet, it seems highly improbable that it will hit stores before summer tour begins.  That being said, given Phish’s pattern of debuting songs at the very beginning of tours, Jones Beach could be the site of many moments like the one just described- debuts of pieces that have never hit public ears.  (I think Fenway will be reserved for the anthems.) We know the band will be coming to tour with over twenty new songs in the mix, and we are guaranteed to bear witness to many pristine vehicles for exploration.  Moving into summer, this prospect of so much new material excites me the most.  Phish will never stop playing their classics, but what remains to be seen is what songs will be the classics of chapter three.

What big “true” debuts did you manage to see?

***

LISTEN TO 7.7.03 “Wolfman’s > Scents” NOW! < LINKS                             (Roll over, click play)

***

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DOWNLOAD OF THE DAY:

4.20.93 Newport Music Hall, Columbus, OH < LINK

4.20.93 Newport Music Hall, Columbus, OH < TORRENT LINK

Newport Music Hall, Columbus, OH

Newport Music Hall, Columbus, OH

When I posted 4.21.93 this at the beginning of the week, someone who attended the show had made the recommendation and request for night one of the stand.  Ask and ye shall receive.  Enjoy some more shredding ’93 and have a great weekend!

I: Runaway Jim, Weigh, Sparkle, Stash, Bouncing Around the Room, It’s Ice, Glide, Uncle Pen, Lawn Boy, David Bowie

II: Chalk Dust Torture, Fluffhead, Sample in a Jar, Big Ball Jam, TMWSIY > Avenu Malkenu > TMWSIY, My Friend My Friend, Llama, You Enjoy Myself, HYHU, Whipping Post, Golgi Apparatus

E: Funky Bitch, Amazing Grace

Source: unknown

Tags: , ,

The Nassau Tweezer

Posted in Uncategorized with the tags , on February 23rd, 2009 by Mr.Miner
Nassau 2.28.03

Nassau 2.28.03

As the Cincinnati weekend came to a close, fans dispersed back across the country with plenty of tales to tell.  With only three shows before Nassau, the date that everyone had circled on their calendars when this tour was announced, Phish’s winter momentum was snowballing.  Two nights after a hot show in Worcester, Phish returned to the scared stomping grounds of Nassau Coliseum- the site of half of The Island Run and, more significantly, the divine events of 4.3.98.  Having stopped there only two other times in 1999, for a pair of wholly underrated shows, the communal anticipation of something huge in Nassau was building.  And huge would turn out to be an understatement.

The first set shone with the band’s second consecutive top-shelf  “Gin”- the first since Cincy’s standout escapade- and the eternally sought after oldie, “Destiny Unbound,” played for the first time in 791 shows (11.15.91).    The overwhelming excitement following this set filled the arena, and had it buzzing like a hornet’s nest during the break.  Yet when people eventually left the Coliseum on this last night of February, their memories would hardly be focused on the first set.

030228_stubHaving only dropped one “Tweezer” thus far on tour- a monster version in Chicago- Phish was due to break out one of their most popular jam vehicles.  As fans assumed their places for what was obviously going to be massive set, the opening lick of the song bled from Trey’s Languedoc.  Boom!  Just like that,  we were amidst a set-opening “Tweezer” that was most certainly heading to great places.  Where- we didn’t know- but there was an overwhelming aura of greatness that surrounded the composed section of the song.

Nassau 2.28.03

Nassau 2.28.03

As we prepared ourselves to enter the Freezer, Phish built up the maniacal, noisy peak before we collectively took the plunge.  As the final phrasing of the melody oozed into the jam, the feeling of potential was limitless.  Jumping right into some lead melodies, Trey joined the band’s directional groove right off the bat.  Moving briskly, Phish pumped through some quintessential “Tweezer” textures before beginning to build the improv outwards.

In a break that left the drums and bass both prominent and reverberating, the music took a distinct turn into the second part of the jam. Feeling the way he wanted the music to move, Trey hopped into the fray with some authoritative leads.  The totality of the jam possessed a laid back vibe as Page tickled the Rhodes in the background and Mike bounced some relaxed patterns.  Trey took front and center, guiding this section of the improv with some quality licks that charted the band’s course.

508809808_6a5329e1c4Soon the music became far quieter, with each member taking their sound down a notch, as Mike and Fish’s mellow, yet popping, groove kept things on track.  It was this moment that set the course for the most triumphant musical passage of the entire winter tour.  With one chord, atop this minimal groove, Trey revved his psychedelic lawnmower, creating a distorted sound that seemed to vibrate and echo like a bizarre elastic band.  The band responded to each guitar chord by slightly shifting their ideas, filling in the space by complementing Trey’s sound.  It was at this point that Trey used an incredibly unique effect and played a series of chords that belonged in a post-modern collage, entering the band into yet a third section of this “Tweezer.”

From this point, the band’s musical ideas fused together as they began to move as one entity.  Mike and Page were straight killing it here, as Trey conceived his next move.  What came next out of his guitar would be a spring of gorgeous, spontaneous melodies that give me the shivers to this day.  This was one of those spectacularly surreal moments that only occur at Phish shows.  The entire band understood what needed to happen and wrapped their groove around Trey’s confessional, creating some of the most sublime music of the year.

Nassau 2.28.03

Nassau 2.28.03

As Trey moved right from these awing melodies into a pattern of distorted chords in which he would echo himself, the band truly hit their stride.  This was the bliss we chased across the country.  This was IT;  this was what we believed in.  This was the reason for it all.  The crowd was engulfed by the cosmos, as the universe’s energy, channeled through our four superheroes, rained down upon us.  Trey moved on to some spectacular and divergent playing in which he threw a beautifully dissonant musical boomerang around the venue; each time he caught it, throwing it higher into the rafters.  This section developed into one of the classic passages of music in the band’s history, as its unique playing and spiritual feeling was a revelation to the entire Phish world.

As this section of other-worldly music wound down, one had to presume that the band would wrap up the “Tweezer.”  But it took them less than a minute to transition into a completely different jam all together!  In some far more grounded improv, Phish entered faster, more straight ahead playing that seemed like it had come from a totally different song altogether, perhaps a “Piper.”  The band would gradually meander their way to some bluesy rock and roll, eventually morphing into a scorching jam around Peter Frampton’s “Do You Feel Like We Do?”  Bringing the song to a second, and completely different type of peak, the band chugged forward, knowing what they were in the midst of creating.

511607974_7b50588edbRarely do Phish songs get two distinct jams, but this Nassau “Tweezer” was an anomaly, boasting three completely different pieces of connected improv.  The central jam was so psychedelic and stratospheric that the band decided to slide people back to earth with another ten minutes of improv.  Eventually- a half-hour after it started-  this “Tweezer” turned into heavily muddied sound effects without a beat, signaling not only the end of the jam, but the oncoming drop of another song, as they sustained these effects for well over two minutes.

Out of the depths came some delicate reggae chords from Trey.  What was at first disorienting turned celebratory as the band glided aboard for the second-ever “Soul Shakedown Party” (2.17.97).  Phish clearly recognized how special the evening had become, and gave the nod by dropping the Marley cover out of the deepest part of the show.  As we all know, the band moved right into a hugely sinister “Bowie” out of this reggae interlude, but that is a separate article for a separate day.

001fThe Nassau “Tweezer,” in my humble opinion, stands as the greatest relic from Winter 2003; and can hold its weight in any “all-time” conversation.  A definitive piece of music of the post-hiatus era, this jam sits right at the top of any 2003 compilation.  Signifying their emerging musical direction that would be furthered come summer tour, this “Tweezer” was a masterpiece.  Phish had made quite the return to the hallowed grounds of Nassau, and with one show left in their comeback run, things looked as promising as ever.

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DOWNLOAD OF THE DAY:

9.24.00 Target Center, Minneapolis, MN < LINK

Target Center, Minneapolis, MN

Target Center, Minneapolis, MN

Here is a highlight from the much-maligned tour of Fall 2000.  While Phish may have been losing steam, they still had what it took to pop out legitimate shows- this being one of them.  The second set opened with a fabulous funk turned ambient excursion of “Cities” which wound its dark path into “Free.”  This show also saw the welcomed return of Velvet Underground’s “Cool It Down” for the first time since Halloween ’98, as one of seven covers played this night.

I: Mellow Mood, Chalk Dust Torture, Back at the Chicken Shack, Sparkle, The Sloth, The Divided Sky, Roggae, First Tube, Punch You in the Eye, Sample in a Jar

II: Cities* > Free, Ya Mar, Carini, Lawn Boy, HYHU > Love You > HYHU, Cool It Down, David Bowie

E: Fire

*w/ ambient jam with Trey on keyboards.
Source : Schoeps m222/mk41 > nt222 > AD-1000 (Ken Rossiter)

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