A Night In the Key of Trey

Posted in Uncategorized with the tags , , , , on March 12th, 2012 by Mr.Miner

3.10.2012 - Walt Disney Concert Hall (Daniel Kalette)

Throughout his musical life—as a member of Phish and beyond—just about any time Trey has stepped on a stage, his guitar playing has instantly become the defining facet of the music and the center of attention. Most often leading his bands with his spontaneous six-string narratives, Red has come to relish the spotlight. But despite standing in the center of the orchestra at Walt Disney Concert Hall on Saturday night in Los Angeles, and working closely with conductor, Scott Dunn, on cues, his guitar playing was not the focus of the performance. Featuring delicate, subtle licks and often “implying” far more than he was actually playing, Trey’s legendary axe was but one piece of the rich sonic tapestry that was the Los Angeles Philharmonic. Allowing his music to come to life in way he, himself, had imagined for decades, Trey’s compositions—and Don Hart’s masterful arrangements of them—became the focus of the show, themselves. Blending in with the symphony, though clearly voicing his electric and acoustic guitar tones, Trey shone in a completely different way on Saturday night, while realizing but another dream in the finale of his four-city symphony tour.

2.14.12 - Pittsburgh (M.Stein)

Several pieces, such as “Divided Sky,” “Water in the Sky,” “Brian and Robert” and “Let Me Lie,” were backed solely by the strings section, providing an ethereal and dreamlike quality to these more mellow songs. But the unquestionable highlights of the show came when whole orchestra joined in the mix, turning pieces like “First Tube,” “Guyute (Orchestral),” “Stash” and “You Enjoy Myself” into mind-bending, guitar-laced, hybrid pieces that pushed the boundaries of classical music. Trey phrased his solos in “First Tube,” “Stash,” and “YEM” in a way that sounded just like his classic playing, but often offering partial licks with little sustain, allowing your mind to connect the dots. At the same time, many parts of his typical solos were given to other members of the orchestra, whether trumpets, flutes or violins, creating an entire melange of Trey’s melodies coming from every angle. Not only diffusing the spotlight, Hart’s arrangements allowed the orchestra to authentically express Trey’s thoughts, underlining their tight partnership since 2004.

Walt Disney Concert Hall (C.Highsmith)

One of the largest ovations in the acoustically immaculate Walt Disney Concert Hall came after Trey’s two-movement piece, originally debuted in 2008 with Orchestra Nashville, “Time Turns Elastic.” Though much maligned by the Phish crowd in the rock setting, the piece was, at times, unrecognizable to its mainstream translation, as the intricacies of the composition were able to breathe through the instruments of an entire orchestra instead of forced through the amps of a rock quartet. Taking on a completely different character in its intended setting, “Time Turns Elastic” was the most challenging piece for the audience to digest. The extensive opening movement (before anything comes in or out of focus) fuses a jazz-like guitar style into an often atonal, and clearly emotional, musical sequence. The meticulous way in which Trey hit every note made it very clear that each one counted—there were no flubs allowed—and this formal tone even translated to his typically goofy face.

Trey and Scott Dunn - 2.14 (Stein)

Throughout the second movement (the known song) it was striking how little guitar Trey played. With his music dancing around him, his focus turned to his heartfelt lyrics and their precise delivery. Trey layered his singing atop the piece as the orchestra did the bulk of the playing. In certain spots he contributed signature licks of the song, while taking enhanced guitar roles in others, but for much his magnum opus, Trey held the strings on his guitar or played in very minimalist fashion. And when “Time Turns Elastic” came to its concluding peak and the audience responded, satisfaction—rather, elation—shone from Trey, as his introspective piece was given proper treatment.

Though Hart’s arrangements took center stage throughout the night, perhaps the most noteworthy Phish-to-symphony metamorphosis took place with “You Enjoy Myself.” Hearing the band’s seminal piece interpreted by so many musicians in an a concert hall that Trey noted, mid-performance, was the best sounding room he’d ever been in, was nothing short of majestic. Following the composed half of the song, the trombone took the honor of “Boy,” “Man,” “God, “Shit,” and the orchestra proceeded to interpret a “YEM” jam! Highlighted by the call and response soloing between Trey and the trombone player in the “jam,” this segment carried a legitimate groove. This “jam” sequence truly illustrated the mastery of Hart’s arrangements, as Trey found some space to take liberty with his own part, even weaving in a tease of “Streets of Cairo” (likely from muscle memory at this point.) But the most impressive part of “You Enjoy Myself,” believe it or not, was how the orchestra interpreted the vocal jam. Taking the parts of the band members’ “voices,” the strings (plus?) imitated the section with staccato phrases that fit congruently with each other, clearly patterned after an actual vocal jam.

2.14.12 - Pittsburgh, PA (M.Stein)

Trey’s emotion of the night was summed up in the way in which he performed a solo chant over this final section. Eyes closed and stepping slightly away from the orchestra, Trey soulfully chanted over the music in a way he debuted in a hallmark performance at Carnegie Hall on 9/12/2009 . A very special evening was topped with an instrumental encore, “The Inlaw Josie Wales,” and ended in multiple standing ovations for all involved. For Trey, the dream continued, and for the LA Philharmonic—a symphony that, in the words of Conductor Laureate, Esa-Pekka Salonen, is “interested in the future” and “not trying to re-create the glories of the past”—their vision was fully realized.

I: First Tube, Water in the Sky*, Divided Sky*, Brian and Robert*, Goodbye Head, Guyute (Orchestral)^, Let Me Lie*, Stash

II: Time Turns Elastic, If I Could*, You Enjoy Myself

E: The Inlaw Josie Wales*

*Trey on acoustic

^Trey on acoustic > electric guitar > acoustic

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Trey In Symphony

Posted in Uncategorized with the tags , , , on November 29th, 2011 by Mr.Miner

Carnegie Hall, 2009 (Chad Batka - NYT)

Just yesterday, Trey shed some light on the band’s early 2012 plans by announcing a his first ever symphony tour. Hitting four cities over the course of a month beginning on February 9, Trey will focus on his fourth current project, and it seems that Phish will remain quiet for at least the first quarter of the year. Trey will perform in Atlanta, Pittsburgh, Denver and Los Angeles, with seemingly plenty of time has been factored in for rehearsals, as each date will feature Trey with a different local orchestra. Scott Dunn, however, will be conducting the entire tour. Despite the ho-hum reaction from much of Phish’s fan base, these shows promise to be unique musical experiences that illustrate diversity of skills possessed by our red-headed Jedi. After annihilating a monstrous summer with Phish and having completed work on his first Broadway musical, “Hands on a Hardbody” with Amanda Green, Trey carved out time to play with the Trey Anastasio Band while also heading into the studio with his solo outfit. Now, as our jack-of-all-trades gets ready to implode Madison Square Garden in a highly-anticipated year-end bash, he has his sights set on a more placid project in the new year. When Phish came back in 2009, all band members said they wanted to leave space in their lives for other endeavors, both musical and familial, and thus far, that is exactly the path they have followed.

9.12.09 - Carnegie Hall (B.Slayter)

Trey first opened this chapter of his career in September of 2008, before Phish came back at Hampton. On September 26th, backed by Orchestra Nashville in Nashville, Tennessee, Trey debuted “Time Turns Elastic” (in its proper setting) while also playing a first set or orchestral pieces, with the only rearranged Phish piece being “Divided Sky.” The following year, in 2009, Trey appeared in Baltimore and New York City for orchestral performances that featured far more Phish material and solo compositions. The second came on September 12 at Carnegie Hall with the New York Philharmonic—a phenomenal night of music that ended with a standout orchestral translation of the Phish opus, “You Enjoy Myself.” The New York Times hailed this ground-breaking performance as:

“that rarest of rarities, a classical-rock hybrid that might please partisans from both constituencies. Set amid a generous group of popular Phish songs — gentle, string-cushioned ballads like “Brian and Robert” and “Let Me Lie,” as well as the audacious, intricate instrumentals “Guyute Orchestral” and “You Enjoy Myself” — the new piece [“Time Turns Elastic”] could hardly have gone wrong.”

Trey’s upcoming, four-show tour will allow him to take the next step step down this cross-cultural career pathway, one that he has taken to notable enthusiasm. As Phish continues to mature together, they will also continue to mature apart from each other. Whether the time apart has taken the form of the Mike Gordon Band, the Trey Anastasio Band, a new child, or simply time-off, the guys of Phish seem to have a solid understanding of what they want out of life these days, and they are doing everything within their power to grow in many directions at once. For most of their lifetimes, these guys have dedicated themselves to Phish, and it’s only natural that their musical interests would diversify over time. But for every musical experience that band members have away from Phish, they bring back new approaches, styles, and ideas to the main stage to push forth the development of our favorite quartet.

9.12.09, Carnegie Hall (Ben Slayter / Slayter Creative)

Those fans hanging onto rumors of winter or early spring dates, however, will have to stash those hopes away for the time being, as it now seems that the earliest we will see Phish come 2012 will be the late-spring, and likely not too much before the beginning of a potential summer tour. The band has previously stated that 2012 would be a light year of touring, specifically because Page is having a child, and this may be the start of such a schedule. Speculation seems pointless now, however, as we still have the biggest stand of the year coming up in just one month! But while we ready ourselves for a return to Madison Square Garden, tickets will go onsale for Trey’s four-show 2012 Winter Tour. The details are as follows:

Tickets will be available through a real time presale beginning Thursday, December 1, at 10:00 am ET and ending Wednesday, December 7, at noon ET at treytickets.rlc.net. Tickets will go on sale to the general public on Thursday, December 8, for Denver and Los Angeles, and Friday, December 9, for Atlanta and Pittsburgh. Visit Trey.com for further details.

  • 2/9: Atlanta Symphony Hall, Atlanta, GA
  • 2/14: Heinz Hall, Pittsburgh, PA
  • 2/28: Boettcher Concert Hall, Denver, CO
  • 3/10: Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles, CA

The Carnegie Hall “You Enjoy Myself

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HAMPTON / WINSTON-SALEM Box Set Giveaway!

The Prize

To promote giving this holiday season, Phish Thoughts is giving away two free copies of the hotly-anticipated 7-disc box set release of Hampton and Winston Salem ’97! All you need to do to win a copy is submit a description of your favorite jam from the three shows in 500 words or less. I will select the five most creative, interesting, and engaging  entries, assign them each a number, and draw the two winners out of a hat! Let’s add some creativity to the contest. The winners, and likely the top five entries, will have their pieces posted next Monday.

All entries must be submitted by this Friday, December 2, at 5 pm Pacific time to mrminer@phishthoughts.com.

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From Cash or Trade.org: New Years Ticket Giveaway!

Cash or Trade.org

“Thank you, fans, for setting the standard for face value tickets and fair trade. To demonstrate our gratitude, we will be selecting seven members who participate in our “New Years Eve Ticket Giveaway” and will be them two tickets to one of the following events: Phish, Furthur, Widespread Panic, Sound Tribe Sector Nine, Umphrey’s McGee, Yonder Mountain String Band, or Moe. Visit CashorTrade.org to enter!

Thank you for taking a stand against ticket scalping and continuing to “Embrace the Face!”
~ Brando and Dusty

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Jam of the Day:

Bathtub Gin > YEM” 11.29.98 II

Thirteen years ago tonight, this stellar sequence closed out Phish’s final show of Fall ’98

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A Night At the Symphony

Posted in Uncategorized with the tags , , , on September 13th, 2009 by Mr.Miner
9.12.09 (C.Batka)

9.12.09 - Carnegie Hall (C.Batka)

It all began back in college.  With intricate, multi-part compositions- arguably better suited for an orchestra than a rock band- Trey began his songwriting days.  Scribing pieces so far-reaching in musical scope, it was mind-numbing how a four-piece outfit could conquer his songs with such proficiency.  And throughout the years, when the band really nailed them, they sounded like- well- a symphony.  “You Enjoy Myself,” “Fluffhead,” “Divided Sky,” The Curtain (With),” “David Bowie,” “Harry Hood,” “Reba”- these weren’t your everyday “rock” songs.  But with Phish as his musical outlet, that’s what they became, some of the most unique rock songs in history, or- in other words- Phish songs.  But there was a vision of something greater that drove these compositions, something unattainable at the time.

TreyYouthDecades later in 2000, during Phish’s first break, Trey turned his energy to his lifelong goal.  Taking a similarly scribed song, “Guyute,” he spent four months with the conductor of the Vermont Youth Orchestra creating an orchestral arrangement of his composition.  And with two benefit performances at the Music Hall in Troy, NY and Burlington’s Flynn Theatre- a show that included his mentor, Ernie Stires- Trey’s new career was underway.  During the hiatus, he also worked with the Nashville Chamber Orchestra- conducting them, at Bonnaroo 2004, through pieces from his first classical album,”Seis De Mayo.”

img_06031

Nashville Program

And on Saturday night at Carnegie Hall, after years of diligence and many baby-steps along the way, Trey’s dream was finally fulfilled.  Playing a full two-set show of his own material with the world-class New York Philharmonic Orchestra, Trey took center stage in one of the music’s most legendary venues, realizing his vision hatched so long ago.  Decked in black, he was the man of the hour, not only showcasing “Time Turns Elastic” in its proper setting, but also highlighting the night with a ridiculously creative arrangement of “You Enjoy Myself.”  On a stage filled with some of the world’s best musicians, Trey’s seminal piece took on a completely new life.  It was the first time that we all got to hear what Trey has been hearing in his head for years.  And it is some of the most surreal music you will ever hear.

9.12.09 - Carnegie Hall (P.Mason)

9.12.09 - Carnegie Hall (P.Mason)

While I couldn’t be at the show last night- all reports and reviews I got from New York City were glowing, and after listening to the show, I certainly understand why.  To hear Phish music in this milieu is absolutely breathtaking; the complexities and emotions are magnified, and the music sounds surprisingly at home.  Blending his guitar with a far greater whole, Trey’s integration with the symphonic tapestry is brilliant.  Arranging all pieces with Nashville’s Don Hart, with whom he collaborated with on “Time Turn Elastic,” the nuances and intricacies of each piece were astounding; Trey’s playing, selfless- his tone, gorgeous.  Making the first complete performance of the next chapter of his career, Trey announced his arrival on one of world’s most prestigious stages.

The way he painted suggestions of his soaring “First Tube” solo against a lush, horn-led backdrop; the enchanting and dreamy, “Brian & Robert;” the soaring power of the strings in “Divided Sky”- was this all a joke?  Trey had gone right ahead and redefined the Phish experience overnight.  And in his recent interview in Timeout: New York, he indicated he would love to see this project grow to where he could tour between Phish activities, playing two nights in a city without repeating any material.  Pretty freakin’ cool if you ask me!  And quite the “side project.”

9.12.09 (LiveMusicBlog)

9.12.09 (LiveMusicBlog)

After playing a series of relatively shorter pieces in the first set, the second set featured but three songs- “Time Turns Elastic,” “Let Me Lie,” and “YEM.”  In its full three-movement incarnation, and set in Carnegie Hall, it was very clear where “Time Turns Elastic” belongs.  In full blossom in Trey’s virtuoso performance, the song was easier to digest after a summer of hearing it as a Phish song,  but after listening to Saturday’s performance, it seems almost silly that it was transposed into a contrived prog-rock “epic.”  Taking on its natural form, as debuted in Nashville and performed in Baltimore, the piece’s innovation and power was evident, and it sounded authentic in its orchestral form.  But the highlight of the night was, without question, the classical debut of “You Enjoy Myself.”

With one of the most renowned symphonies on the planet, Trey played through a rendition of his seminal work that has to be heard to be believed.  The creativity, fun, and sheer genius on display was completely over the top, as the once-imaginary version of the song burst into reality.  Complete with an interpretation of his band’s improv, this “YEM” quickly developed into a career-defining moment for Trey.  With their collaborative ingenuity teeming, he even complemented the orchestra as the piece came to rest in a mesmerizing “vocal jam.”  And as he did, one can’t help but think that college kid from the mid-eighties, somewhere inside the mature maestro onstage, was beaming with a goofy, radiant smile.

***

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Winged music noteJams of the Day: Carnegie Hall

You Enjoy Myself

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Simply amazing. I am re-posting it for the Monday morning crowd.

Time Turns Elastic

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In this setting, this composition is stunning.

First Tube

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An unexpected way to start a night at the symphony!

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DOWNLOAD OF THE DAY:

9.14.1990 The Living Room, Providence, RI < Torrent

9.14.1990 The Living Room, Providence, RI < Megaupload

phish-living-room-2-15-90

Feb 1990 Poster

We are taking it back nineteen years to the day, to a small club in Providence, RI for today’s download.  Those from the Northeast are most likely familiar with the intimate Living Room, a club that is still active today.  An old-school nugget to start the week that features the debut of “Destiny Unbound.”  Enjoy!

I: Suzy Greenberg, Bouncing Around the Room, The Landlady, Reba, Paul and Silas, Stash, Dinner and a Movie, I Didn’t Know

II: The Asse Festival, The Squirming Coil, Buried Alive > Tweezer, Magilla, Cavern, Lizards, Destiny Unbound*, Fire

E: Going Down Slow

*first time played

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The Carnegie Hall “YEM”

Posted in Uncategorized with the tags , , , on September 12th, 2009 by Mr.Miner

Download and Listen:

9.12.09 Carnegie Hall “YEM” < link

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Unreal.

(thanks Mitch!)

10718_160832659256_660764256_3517986_6684819_n

9.12.09 – Carnegie Hall (Photo: Pete Mason)

Trey and the New York Philharmonic Orchestra < Whole show download

I. First Tube, Inlaw Josie Wales, Brian and Robert, Divided Sky, Water in the Sky, Pebbles and Marbles, Guyute

II. Time Turns Elastic, Let Me Lie, You Enjoy Myself E: If I Could

NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW < link

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“YEM” (partial)

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Time Turns Fantastic

Posted in Uncategorized with the tags , on May 27th, 2009 by Mr.Miner

970699Less than a week after the album release and second-ever performance of Trey’s orchestral opus “Time Turns Elastic,” Phish gave the community a significant pre-tour jolt by releasing the newly-completed Phish version as a single on iTunes yesterday morning.  Utilizing another video announcement, this time of a studio montage while the song peaks as a soundtrack, Phish punctuated the arrival of their newest piece of music- and by the way it was presented, they seem damn proud of it.  A thirteen-plus minute composition, “Time Turns Elastic” will be featured on Phish’s forthcoming album and will certainly jump into this summer’s rotation before too long.

5.21.09 Baltimore (D. Morris)

5.21.09 Baltimore (D. Morris)

What started out as an idea for a Phish song during Trey’s solo time in Whitehall, NY, transformed into an orchestral piece, with two movements, in collaboration with Don Hart of Orchestra Nashville.  After debuting “Time Turns Elastic” at Nashville’s Ryman Auditorium last September, Trey set out to record and release his one of a kind piece.  Right around that time, an acoustic demo of Trey playing the song by himself in The Barn surfaced, giving everyone a better point from which to imagine the piece as a Phish song; but I’m not sure anyone imagined this.  Rearranging the piece’s second movement for a four-piece band and recording it in New York City, Phish has morphed the symphonic composition into a musical suite that will transfix audiences this summer.

What jumps out about “Time Turns Elastic”- as compared to Phish’s older multi-part compositions- is its cohesiveness.  As opposed to many of the band’s classic songs that often contrast different musical milieus with precise, and sometimes abrupt, Zappa-like transitions, “Time Turns Elastic,” flows naturally from one segment into the next, each connected with a melodic framework that provides a unifying thread throughout the piece.  While moving between many different compositional textures, there is always a familiar element of the song’s melodic structure, holding it together coherently.

tte_200

Time Turns Elastic "Single"

After listening through the track about ten times yesterday, I figure there have to be at at least four or five distinct places where Phish could jump into different improvisational segments.  Thus it will be interesting to see where the band stretches the song out when it’s performed live- not to mention there is a chance they will choose to play it as a straight composition- but they are Phish.  Swimming between upbeat textures and darker segments, musical peaks and valleys, “Time Turns Elastic” has an incredibly dynamic quality.  Some parts feel genuinely uplifting, while others are certainly somber and introspective, providing a sense of musical narrative.

(G.Stewart)

(G.Stewart)

The playing on the track sounds like Phish has been firing in the studio and the video can confirm the fun they are having.  The most essential part on the track is played by Fishman, who is “doin’ work” the entire time, creating extraordinarily delicate beats and cradling the music with a tapestry of rhythms that guide the band through the many diverse sections.  Also interesting about “Time Turns Elastic” is the “whole-band” focus- no one person plays lead- instead, Trey, Mike, and Page, collectively provide the musical filling.  While Trey wrote this song by himself, it is certainly not a guitar-led piece, rather a more collaborative effort that may foreshadow a newer song model.

Beyond a strict musical opus, there is a five-piece lyrical montage of poetic imagery that narrates a story right alongside.  A philosophical statement about the fluctuations of time and our lives, Trey shares a piece of his own with us through this song.  With images like the following: “But I am a submarine / and the submarine sinks below the ground” to “These are the reasons / that we lay down on the / ground / Drawn through a funnel, all / the colors run together / Turning brown;” “Wait for the waves to come / and carry me away / Down on the ground the / sound of voices in the / echoes seem to say;” “And the carousel turns into / breath around me;” Trey has certainly responded to his post-hiatus pop song naysayers with his strongest and most personal lyrical effort in some time.  Essentially, Time Turns Elastic is a musical reflection on Trey’s time of struggle and the celebration of the resiliency of the human spirit.  (Cue haters vomiting.)

Hampton (J.Bryce)

Hampton (J.Bryce)

Yet while many of the lyrical themes are personally connected to Trey’s life, they are universally applicable to all of ours.  We have all gone through periods where time has turned elastic- sped quickly or crawled- depending on our state of mind and activity, and we understand the fluctuations of emotion.  We have all felt ourselves “in and out of focus” or the “world turning upside down;” and similarly, we have all felt “kissed by the water and held in [our] mother’s arms” and “paved with gold gleaming in daylight.”  It is authentic human emotion that “Time Turns Elastic” draws on, both lyrically and musically, striking a chord somewhere inside us all.  Maybe you don’t feel it yet after a listen or two, but wait until this summer is over- you will.

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DOWNLOAD OF THE DAY:

7.20.99 Molson Amphitheatre, Toronto, ON < TORRENT LINK

1999-07-20moLet’s take it north of the border for today’s download to Toronto, home of pleasant Molson Amphitheatre, right on the water.  In Phish’s first visit, they christened the venue with a great first set that was highlighted by the closing triumvirate of “Ghost,” “Wilson,” “YEM.”  The second set, solid all the way through, was highlighted by the closing “2001 > Misty Mountain Hop” debut.  All in all, a nice nugget from the north!

I: Chalk Dust Torture, Sample in a Jar, Cars Trucks Buses, The Sloth, The Divided Sky, Waste, Ghost, Wilson, You Enjoy Myself

II: Twist, The Moma Dance, What’s the Use?, Train Song, Also Sprach Zarathustra > Misty Mountain Hop*

E: Guyute, Hello My Baby

*First time played

Source: Unknown

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“Times Turns Elastic” Revisited

Posted in Uncategorized with the tags , , , on March 25th, 2009 by Mr.Miner
10.27.08 (M.Copeland)

10.27.08 Nashville (M.Copeland)

As many of you have heard, Trey will be releasing his orchestral collaboration with Don Hart, “Time Turns Elastic,” as an album on May 21st through his own Rubber Jungle Records.  A press-release from Red Light Management, reprinted yesterday on Glide, detailed the evolutionary process of the piece, and added the shining nugget of info that “Time Turns Elastic” will “come full circle when Phish performs it on the band’s upcoming summer tour, interpreting the piece as an epic rock song.”  Interestingly enough, that was the intention all along Trey explained.  “I was living in upstate New York when I started writing this little tune that just kept growing.  I initially thought it would be a Phish song, but after I sent a demo of it to Don, it just grew organically into an orchestral piece.”  Now we are talking!

10.27.08 Dress Rehearsal (M.Copeland)

10.27.08 Dress Rehearsal (M.Copeland)

Before summer tour starts in earnest, Trey will perform the east coast debut of “Time Turns Elastic” on May 21st with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra.  This special evening focuses more on Trey, and less on the orchestra, than the Nashville unveiling in September where the orchestra played an opening set.  The rest of the show will be comprised of “classic Phish songs and solo Anastasio compositions.”  This will surely be a night to remember, but let’s now turn to the Phish.

When hearing this multi-faceted piece in Nashville, and then again when the acoustic demo surfaced, its potential as a Phish song struck me immediately.  With rich lyrical symbolism, powerful melodic themes, and an ethereal reflection on life- it seemed like a perfect fit for Phish.  Talk about a multi-part compositional epic- it’s been a while since we have seen something of this complexity and magnitude emerge from Trey.  Along with the band’s host of new songs, and forthcoming album, this summer looks to be full steam ahead, with little concern for the rear view mirror.

3.7.09 (M.Walters)

3.7.09 (M.Walters)

Knowing that Phish will be tackling such a challenging piece brings great hope for their future endeavors.  Placed in the context of their renewed commitment to composition, practice and being a well-oiled machine, the addition of “Time Turns Elastic” to their repertoire is wholly fitting.  While its complexity is congruent with their musical mission, the piece’s lyrical sensibility seems distinctly appropriate- time is what we make of it.  And as Phish-time now bends backwards and moves forwards at the same time, this piece is the ideal soundtrack.  Mature in feel and meaning, this will be  a latter-day Phish triumph once integrated into shows.  As we all prepare to return to life as we’ve love it, one of the lyrics resonates as particularly poignant:

And when it’s time the landslide
will free what froze inside
While all around the rocks collide
You finally see the lines
That point toward the light that never dies.

3.8.09 (P.Lucks)

3.8.09 (P.Lucks)

As we discover our initial late-summer ticket fate, moving back towards that undying light, one can only imagine the version of Phish we will see playing come Red Rocks, The Gorge, and SPAC- the possibilities are mind-blowing.  Off to a running start in Hampton, the band has infused the entire community with a child-like excitement for what is to come only two plus months away.  As events continue to unfold, the hype for the future will continue to grow until exploding at Jones Beach on June 4th.  And, hey, that’s only a mere 72 days away!

Listen to “Time Turns Elastic” Acoustic Demo now! < LINK (Roll over link, click play)

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RUMOR MILL:  FENWAY ANYWAY?

fenwayparkThis article from Boston Music Spotlight on March 23rd, continues to speculate about a Fenway opener on May 31st, right after Dave Matthews takes over Red Sox Nation for two nights.  They also mention the god-awful rumor of a Texas festival- let’s keep our fingers crossed on that one.  As anyone can tell you, Phish tour and Texas is like oil and water- despite the great music the band has produced in The Lone Star State.

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DOWNLOAD OF THE DAY:

8.7.96 Red Rocks < LINK

8.7.96 Red Rocks < TORRENT LINK

Phish 1996 (J.Richter)

Phish 1996 (J.Richter)

As we all lament or celebrate our Red Rocks situation today, on Phish Thoughts, we finish our cruise through the band’s 1996 four-night stand. Final night highlights are strewn throughout the second set, including a smoking “Runaway Jim” and a memorable “Colonel Forbin’s” narrative about the indigenous iguanas.  We can now only wait to see what the next four nights at Red Rocks have in store for us!

I: Punch You in the Eye, Sparkle, Stash, Ya Mar, Gumbo, Taste, Lawn Boy, 99 Years*, Ode to a Dream*, Doin’ My Time*

II: Runaway Jim**, Free, Colonel Forbin’s Ascent > Famous Mockingbird, Possum, Life on Mars?, You Enjoy Myself, Hello My Baby

E: Bouncing Around the Room, Golgi Apparatus

*First time played; with Tim O’Brien on mandolin, bouzouki, and lead vocals. O’Brian is a former member of Hot Rize  ***With “Gypsy Queen” jam

Source: Schoeps64V > Oade > 250 > DAP1 > D(1)

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Time Turns Elastic Download

Posted in Uncategorized with the tags , on September 29th, 2008 by Mr.Miner
9.27.08 - Nashville

9.27.08 - Nashville

Trey and Orchestra Nashville 9.27.08 (whole show) <<LINK

TIME TURNS ELASTIC REMASTER <<LINK

I. “XL” J. Mark Scearce, “Divided Sky,” “Concertino” Don Hart, “Orient and Occident” Arvo Part, “Le Tombeau de Couperin (prelude)” Maurice Ravel

II. Times Turns Elastic

Movement I: Magnets and Revolutions, Ruby Shaded Sea

Movement II: Submarine, In Long Lines, Violet, Violet, Summer Sound Shower, Splinters of Hail, Funnels, Carousel


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In and Out of Focus

Posted in Uncategorized with the tags , on September 29th, 2008 by Mr.Miner

In and out of focus, time turns elastic

In and out of focus…

In and out of focus, time turns…

Music exists as a medium that mirrors the human experience; a way to evoke wordless feelings, a way to talk when language can no longer describe.  In the truest sense, this was the essence of Trey’s orchestral opus, Time Turns Elastic. Debuted in Nashville’s historic Ryman Auditorium on Saturday night, Trey’s autobiographical piece narrated the story of his past few years, while obliterating traditional boundaries of classical music.  Standing humbly, center stage with his Languedoc, Trey wove melodic and lyrical tales of his life within the rich musical tapestry of an avant garde orchestra.  Very much a part of the orchestra’s palate, rather than playing on top of it, this performance focused on the music as a work rather than someone playing guitar.

photo - Bill Kucinski

photo - Bill Kucinski

With an elegant program specifically designed around Times Turns Elastic, Orchestra Nashville played a first set of relevant orchestral pieces.  Opening with an introductory piece without Trey, director Paul Gambill, then then welcomed him to the stage for a breathtaking rendition of Divided Sky.  Playing in an incredibly delicate and understated fashion, he worked his way through the Phish classic that was presented as a straight piece of the program with no specific introduction.  He then sat in as part of “Concertino,” with a with group of two mandolin players, and played acoustic guitar while sitting in the back row as part of the orchestra- one of the most ego-less things Trey has ever done on stage.  The set featured two more symphonic pieces, the last, “Le Tombeau de Couperin,” a Ravel piece that greatly inspired Trey and influenced the opening movement of Time Turns Elastic, as Gambill explained. Yet, the evening was focused on the music after intermission.

Surprisingly subtle, and distinctly non-Phishy, Trey delicately played through the debut of his piece with a clear sense of deep emotion.  Yet, as we are accustomed to hearing Trey speak to us through his cosmic guitar fury, this time he had over 25 people to help him share his thoughts.  This changed the dynamic of the concert, a story was told collectively as opposed to his upcoming tour, which represents more of a monologue.  As life, Time Turns Elastic contained a distinct ebb and a flow to its emotional color, moving through playful and pensive, uplifting and somber segments.  Comprised of two movements, the first instrumental, and the second, complete with whimsical poetic verses, this performance was one of the most unique nights of Trey’s musical journey.  As lyrical segments emerged, lending a Broadway-eque feel, Trey sang delicately, using as his voice as yet another instrument to add to the symphonic whole; an instrument, interestingly enough, often more prominent than his guitar.  Staring into his magical space above, Trey shared his words in a gentler way, greatly divergent from his arena-rock norm.  Taking a complete 180 degree turn from a normal Trey-based event, the spotlight was less focused on him than ever, despite his stage positioning.

photo - Bill Kucinski

photo - Bill Kucinski

In and out of focus, time turns elastic

In and out of focus…

In and out of focus, time turns…

Sounding like the musical backdrop to a dream, Trey provided heartfelt accents and melodies to the music, as his notes seemed to float on the orchestra’s musical ocean, navigating the forty minute piece.  The second, and far longer movement, saw Trey layering his self-reflective symbolic poetry over the music, each part having its own name, though there was no break in the music.  Picking up momentum during the last segment, “Carousel,” Trey’s guitar became far more prominent and pronounced as the piece built to its final peak.

In and out of focus, time turns elastic

In and out of focus…

In and out of focus, time turns…

photo - Bill Kucinski

photo - Bill Kucinski

Though poetry can be interpreted in countless ways, being someone who wholeheartedly believes that Trey, despite his repertoire of side projects, is truly all about Phish, this is my take.  This consistent reprise of this verse, and accompanying melody, throughout the movement brought out the meaning of the tale.  From the time around Phish ended, he has moved in and out of focus, grappling with the various realities that have confronted him.  Yet, with every part of unfocused life will inevitably come the counterpart of living in a directed and intuitive way.  We become lost and then find ourselves again, and Trey has found himself again.  Time is what we make of it, often stretched and pulled to extremes, as life’s challenges and successes bring us on the universal roller coaster.  Through these times, he never lost sight of his heart; he never lost sight of Phish.

And when its time, the landslide

will free what froze inside

While all around the rocks collide

You finally see the lines

That point toward the light that

never dies

photo - Bill Kucinski

photo - Bill Kucinski

The landslide has come.  Time is thawing the frozen part of Trey’s life, the part that has always made him the happiest.  As he pondered his future throughout the past years, the light and hope of Phish, that would bring him back into focus once again, never died.  Like the sun of your soul, while it can get shaded, it can never be extinguished.  As we all anticipate the future of Phish, the future of our own musical journies, we can feel assured that Trey is right there with us and just as excited as we are.

And this life, it’s bending and

swelling around me

Turning and peeling into the

mist around me

And the winds all rising in the west

around me

And the carousel turns into

breath around me

In and out of focus, time turns

elastic

Time turns….

The final lyric of the piece suggests hope- hope that life again will turn another page and the winds will lift us back into the sky.  Breathing life into a once lifeless force, hope is bringing Phish back again.  Time turns; we turn too.  The light never dies.

TIME TURNS ELASTIC CLIPS

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Clip #2

Clip # 3 (Unembeddable)

DIVIDED SKY

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Trey @ Nashville FLACs

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